All Star Panelist Roger Simon on Biden’s Dimming Bulb and Cuomo’s Probable Impeachment

All Star Panelist Roger Simon on Biden’s Dimming Bulb and Cuomo’s Probable Impeachment

 

Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed all-star panelist and senior editor-at-large at The Epoch Times, Roger Simon, in-studio to weigh in on the decline of Joe Biden, his administration, and the Andrew Cuomo sexual harassment case.

(Jen Psaki clip plays)

Leahy: There is the worst liar in American history, Jen Psaki. The purported press secretary for the Biden maladministration, saying something that’s just massively stupid. Roger, what would be the very first thing you would do? The most common sense thing you could do to help stop the spread of COVID?

Simon: Close the border. Period. End of story. I mean, of course. Something’s going on, something smells. There is a fake-out to the public here that is huge. It’s not even subtle. I mean, how anyone can believe this is beyond me. And maybe a lot of people don’t. But we’re used to being sheep.

Leahy: It’s a deliberate policy.

Simon: Yes. How can it not be?

Leahy: Yeah, exactly right. And if you look around, the array of liars of dishonest people is astonishing. From the CDC director who just says one stupid thing after stupid thing. Now the sergeant general, the sergeant general is saying something stupid.

Simon: Yes. It appears that they’re ready to vaccinate the kids. Now, that is particularly crazy, since we don’t know what these vaccines really do. They are mRNA vaccines and they could be affecting reproductive organs and things down the line.

We don’t even know that. It’s like we are living in the Middle Ages with superstitions running on. But there’s something else running on it and it’s called m-o-n-e-y.

Leahy: Money.

Simon: I’d love to quote the great H.L. Mencken. When somebody says it’s not about the money, it’s about the money.

Leahy: H.L. Mencken a great American journalist from the 1920s who documented the famous Scopes trial here in Tennessee back in the 1920s. You make a very excellent point. It’s interesting you talk about the similarities between the Biden maladministration, the world as it exists today, and the Middle Ages when everything was anti-science back then.

Simon: Right.

Leahy: And anti-fact. I hear some of these “scientists” talk, and I think: you’re just a propagandist. You’re not a scientist.

Simon: They’re either under the pay of somebody. (Chuckles) It’s not directed, but it’s very clear. You play by the rules, we support you. You don’t play by the rules. We don’t support you. The same way unions work.

Leahy: The whole concept of principle seems to be gone, and now everything’s being replaced by a sort of tribalism. And the tribes in the United States at the top are the elite, the Big Tech guys, the Democrats. And maybe, is that what is that? Ten percent of the country, five percent of the country telling the rest of the country what to do?

Simon: Maybe two percent.

Leahy: Maybe.

Simon: The word elites always disturbs me too. It disturbed Donald Trump, too. I remember in a couple of speeches he was pointing at the audience and saying, you’re the elites, because they’re not really elites. They’re just bullies.

Leahy: That’s a good point. By the way, story at The Tennessee Star. I’d like to get your reaction to this. Headline: Texas Congressman Calls for the Impeachment of Biden Over Immigration Policy.

Texas Republican Congressman Chip Roy is calling for the impeachment of President Joe Biden and the impeachment of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, citing their “reckless immigration policy” that many lawmakers argue is endangering the lives of Texans and Americans. What’s your reaction to that?

Simon: Well, I support it, but good luck to him. But obviously, Biden is taking over. Probably not at his own behest. I wonder who’s really behind it all?

Leahy: Who is manipulating Biden’s brain? That is functioning below-average level.

Simon: Barack Obama. I think it’s second degree. Goes through Susan Rice. She’s sitting there in the White House and passing it on.

Leahy: That’s a good theory.

Simon: That’s my theory about have – it’s only a theory.

Leahy: So Joe has always been, you know …

Simon: A yes man.

Leahy: A yes man. Has he ever had an original thought? All of his thoughts are whatever the party says? Other than to make money from your family.

Simon: There is an interesting video, I think it’s still on YouTube before being blocked. There’s an interview with Clarence Thomas about when Biden was interrogating him during his confirmation hearings in 1991.

And Biden was saying collegially uncloaked to Clarence Thomas. You and I understand this point because we’re both lawyers. Thomas said he didn’t have a clue what Biden meant. (Laughs) Biden is not the brightest bulb. He wasn’t the brightest bulb then and it’s dimming.

Leahy: He went to Syracuse University Law School, and he was in the bottom third of his class.

Simon: Lower than that. And he actually plagiarized. He didn’t plagiarize as people do in college very often, like a slight paragraph because they’re not very smart.

Leahy: And don’t know how to cite it.

Simon: He just copied an entire legal brief page to page. (Leahy laughs) In law school! Think about that one.

Leahy: That kind of gives you an insight. I think if you look into his pattern of behavior, he basically was sort of like a high school athlete type guy, and he thought he was the coolest guy in town and didn’t really hit the books that much, from what I can tell.

He’s social. Very social. Just ask Tara Reid. (Laughs) Tara Reid is the woman who accused him of sexually harassing her. But apparently, the only sexual harassment stories that he focuses on right now have to do with Andrew Cuomo.

Simon: Yes. Because Cuomo is so ganged up on that Biden has to go that way.

Leahy: Where does the Cuomo story end up in your view? What’s your best guess?

Simon: This is one case where he actually might be impeached. I think he’ll be impeached.

Leahy: Will he be convicted?

Simon: He might be convicted of impeachment.

Leahy: I’m kind of with you on that. He’s gonna fight it all the way.

Simon: Of course. (Inaudible talk)

Listen to the third hour here:

– – –

Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.
Photo “Andrew Cuomo” by Andrew Cuomo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Epoch Times Senior Editor Roger Simon Discusses His Latest Piece and Urges Citizens to Run for Local School Boards

The Epoch Times Senior Editor Roger Simon Discusses His Latest Piece and Urges Citizens to Run for Local School Boards

 

Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed all-star panelist and senior editor-at-large at The Epoch Times, Roger Simon, in-studio to speak about his latest piece addressing the need for citizens to take back America by running for their school board.

Leahy: We are joined in the studio by our very good friend, my former boss at PJTV.  Also Academy Award-nominated screenwriter and now a senior editor-at-large for The Epoch Times, Roger Simon. Roger, good morning.

Simon: This is a good morning because the coffee is good here. (Giggles)

Leahy: I made it, especially for you.

Simon: Because I complained.

Leahy: You must start the day off with good coffee. And as our listeners are there getting up, most of them are brewing their coffee right now. And they’re starting to pour it. And so, like us, we are enjoying coffee as we have our morning discussions.

Simon: I was just going to say one thing about coffee. Woody Allen said life is 90 percent about showing up. Actually, it’s not even said about a coffee.

Leahy: Coffee helps you show up and get the day started.

Simon: You have a terrific commentary at The Epoch Times. Theepochtimes.com. I’d like you to talk about it. I think this is the central point of what’s happening in America today. You write, to save America, run for school board.

Simon: Yes. I don’t think there’s anything more important John Q or Jane Q citizen can do other than run for school board at this point in the history of the United States. Ironically, as I say in the piece, it’s more important than running for Senate or Congress or any highfaluting job you can think of it. It’s the grassroots of the grassroots.

What’s interesting about it is that one of the commenters on my piece already – and it only went up at 11 o’clock last night, but it’s really getting a lot of traction – it reminded us that Lenin said to give him four years of educating any young person and he would have them for life.

Leahy: And I think those four years kind of go up to fourth grade. By fourth grade, they’re 90 percent formed, I think.

Simon: I think you’re right.

Leahy: Of course, we have actually some educators out there who may comment on that note. Just as an aside tonight, Roger, I’ll invite you to join me at this event. It is an open house for Thales Academy in Franklin at 6 pm.

If you come, you might want to write about it at The Epoch Times. This is a fabulous private school. It’s a chain now of eight.

Simon: People have been telling me about that for a couple of years, and I am anxious to see it.

Leahy: They use direct instruction as the most effective way to teach reading, writing, and arithmetic. Since it’s most effective, the teachers’ unions hate it. But it’s very effective.

And they have a classical education based on the values of Western civilization. They learn about American values and it’s a great place. The tuition cost is just a little over $5,000 a year.

Simon: That’s pretty good.

Leahy: That’s really good. Tonight on Carothers Parkway in Franklin.

Simon: This is all about running for the school board. And I learned a few things from my colleague and from my wife but also from my colleague Trevor Lauden at The Epoch Times who’s been studying this.

If you’re going to run for school board, which is a very important thing to do considering what’s happened with schools, where they’re teaching Critical Race Theory and all the rest of the absolute Marxist lies to your children, you should do two things: Do not run by yourself and try to run with four or five other people.

Leahy: A slate. It’s easier to organize campaigns that way. If you’re running by yourself, the opposition, basically a bunch of lefty groups, particularly here in Williamson County for years, have been doing this.

That’s why of the 12 members of the Williamson County School Board, about 10 are lefties and two are just struggling to deal with all that pressure from the left.

Simon: As we have heard, and there’s been a lot of research on this, that people get slanted very easily in campaigns when they’re by themselves because in the last three days they publicize, you know, when did you stop beating your wife or one of those kinds of things.

Leahy: And you got a parking ticket you didn’t pay 20 years ago. You are a scofflaw.

Simon: One of those things. You have no time to reply and you have no allies in making it good. So do it as a group. And I’ll tell the second thing.

Leahy: Alright, we’ll hold off till after the break.

(Commercial break)

Leahy: A great piece to Save America, Run for School Board. Now you were giving advice to people running for school board. I think Trevor Loudon is a guy who suggested this. Number one, run as a slate with others. Great advice.

Simon: That one came from my wife. But the second one comes from Trevor. And it’s true. And that is not just criticize, which we have to do and highlight Critical Race Theory and the rest of the nonsense that’s being inculcated in children.

But also come up with and have a program that you want to replace it with. A specific one. Thales Academy is one good example. The place that leads the country in all this is Hillsdale College. And if you go online, you can see their K-12 programs.

You don’t need to run with super details of this. Four or five bullet points are plenty for everybody to digest. But you’ve got to have something when you run for all or the people to say, oh, what are you going to do? Well, this is what we’re going to do.

Leahy: Implement this curriculum. Classic education curriculum, a pro-American history. Honest pro-American history.

Simon: And not this nonsense like two plus two don’t equal four because they’re racist or the other extreme stuff that’s being thrown out there right now.

Leahy: I don’t know if anybody’s ever told you this, Roger, but you are a very good writer. I’m just going to read two paragraphs from your piece. You’d be saving America from turning into the bleakest socialist Communist state imaginable, because that is what our current educational system, K-12 is designed to do.

And sadly, has been successful in doing literally for decades. And it’s only getting worse. You would in the process also be a true revolutionary in the tradition of the founders of our country in bringing back truth, justice, and the American way to our children and our children’s children.

Simon: That is rather good.

Leahy: No, it is great. It’s a lyrical salute to America.

Simon: Well, thank you. It took me a while to get there having had a left-wing path.

Leahy: (Laughs) But everybody has a left-wing path. You know, the famous quote from Churchill. “If you’re not a liberal when you’re 20, you don’t have a heart. And if you’re not a conservative when you’re 40, you don’t have a brain.”

Simon: Right.

Leahy: Except the problem is a lot of people kind of get stuck in that liberal stance because as we’re talking about the schools.

The John Dewey approach to schooling is a propaganda approach, and we have a generation of children who have come through schools where they aren’t taught to think independently, but rather to kind of anticipate the answer the teacher is looking for.

Simon: That answer is so dull and socialistic. And it’s quite sad what’s happened, because of the self-replicating system. The people who become teachers have been taught that, too, for years and years and years. So what we need is you, John Q citizen, to get out there and run for school board.

Leahy: And yet, Roger, you know, just thinking about this independently right now, I will say for those in our listening audience who are saying, yeah, I’ll run for school board. Then they think about it a little bit. It is a daunting task, given the current structure.

Let’s think about Metro Nashville Public Schools. Right now there are nine members of the school board. Eight of them are lunatic, left-wing ideologues. And one friend, Fran Bush, actually has a brain and is an intelligent person and has common sense. But it’s very difficult. She’s been our guest here in-studio many a time.

And when you look at the kind of groupthink conformity, left-wing ideology promoted by the school board director and their focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion. And then, headline at The Tennessee Star this morning: Metro Nashville Public Schools Director Calls for Board to Issue New Mask Mandate.

Simon: Here’s the irony in the whole thing. The United States spends more money on public education per capita than almost any country in the world. I believe Switzerland was once more. It varies, but we’re pretty close to the top and we’re getting terrible results. Think about that.

What a war on black people that is. Teaching equity and inclusion and all the rest of these buzzwords that are nothing but political power or fraud is an insult to the very people they’re trying to help.

They are the people who get screwed. Any Democrat out there should be ashamed of themselves. I used to be a Democrat, and I’m saying that. I mean, grow a brain.

Leahy: The problem is so they don’t think, they don’t analyze data, they just drop into almost a zealous religious approach.

Simon: Totally religious.

Leahy: It’s the religion of the left of totalitarianism, and it’s extraordinarily dangerous. We talked about this. The Judeo-Christian principles of Western civilization, that really is the building block of our American constitutional republic.

Simon: Of course it is. But sometimes they’re hard to follow. It’s easier to follow the leaders of the left who are going against that on every level. But you can save the country and yourselves by waking up to this. And I’m talking to liberals like I was. Some of them might be listening to this show.

Leahy: Our friend Karl, to whom I lost a bet because he bet that Joe Biden would be inaugurated. And I bet that it would be Trump. And I lost that bet. Took him out and had a steak dinner with him, bought it at Rafferty’s. Karl’s a great guy.

He got his start as a waiter at Rafferty’s and now has his own business, basically hauling junk and trash away from folks and very successful. But still, he’s got a certain worldview that’s different from ours. But he listens and we’re delighted he does.

Simon: Hello Karl. (Leahy laughs) We’ve never met.

Leahy: He is a nice guy.

Simon: But getting people to change their politics is very hard because most people have a whole network of reasons that they can’t change and that they won’t face or look at including work, including family, including friends. And it goes on and on.

And I’ve seen that all over the place. And I think most of us have. And right now we’re in a very bad place in our country because a lot of us are hating each other for reasons that have nothing to do with reality and have everything to do with being manipulated.

Leahy: But that’s an intentional effort at dividing the country, don’t you think?

Simon: Absolutely.

Leahy: This is what the Democratic leadership and I’ll go on, George Soros, Mark Zuckerberg, and the Chinese Communist Party, to me, all seem to be aligned in promoting American division.

Simon: Oh, absolutely. And they’re doing a good job, unfortunately. So it’s up to us. And that’s why back to the school board. That’s one of the places that any reasonably educated person can get in there and try to stop it.

When you were talking about how skewed the Metro school board is here, eight to one, and so forth, don’t let that stop you. Go, as I mentioned earlier, get three or four or five friends to run with you.

Leahy: As a slate.

Simon: As a slate. Don’t do it by yourself. Then you’re just running into a wall and it’s silly. But everybody’s got a few friends who are like-minded and do it together. First of all, you’ll help each other.

Secondly, you get more money that way from supporters. And that’s what you can do. And if we do that all over the country, the country is going to change.

Leahy: That’s a very good point. I think it’s an organizational challenge to a degree. Because it does have some similarities, I think, to the Tea Party movement…

Simon: It does.

Leahy: Way back when in 2008, 2009. You and I were involved.

Simon: You more than I.

Leahy: But it was putting people together and focusing them on a common goal. So we’ll see how it all plays out. Very insightful, Roger

Listen to the full third hour here:

– – –

Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.
Photo “Board Meeting” by KOMUnews (CC BY 2.0).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies Explains Why He’s Called for the Withdrawal from the 1951 Refugee Convention Treaty

Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies Explains Why He’s Called for the Withdrawal from the 1951 Refugee Convention Treaty

 

Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies Mark Krikorian to the newsmaker line to discuss his recent call for the withdrawal of the United States from the decades-old 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 protocol as the southern border leaks more than Latin American refugees.

Leahy: We are joined now on our newsmaker line by our very good friend, Mark Krikorian, the executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies. Mark, welcome and thank you, thank you.

Thank you for writing your very important article at the National Review Online. Time to Withdraw from the UN Refugee Treaty. Thanks so much. It’s about time, isn’t it?

Krikorian: Oh, yeah, absolutely. Because we’re talking about a lot of loopholes in the law, and how are we going to, you know, sort of nip here and tuck there. But you got to go to the root of the problem which is that we are subject, we signed a treaty 70 years ago.

This is a lifetime ago. A UN treaty on refugees. But it was written in – the terms of it are based on post World War II and the beginning of the Cold War conditions. That’s a world that no longer exists. And yet we have signed the treaty.

We signed the sequel to it, but it doesn’t matter. We’re still subject to its terms, and we incorporated them into our law. And the main problem here is not refugees that we go and pick and resettle in the U.S. That’s a problem.

But that’s something that’s up to us. We run refugee resettlement. I know Nashville has a real issue with a lot of refugee settlements, but that’s something that we under our law and under our decision-makers do. And I think we need to change it, but we have the power to do that ourselves.

The real problem with this treaty is that it sets up asylum law as well. Which are illegal immigrants coming into the U.S., sneaking in, overstaying a visa, whatever it is, and then saying, you have to let me stay because of the terms of this refugee treaty.

And that’s what we need to fix because if we don’t, we don’t have control over our own borders. Basically, the rest of our immigration laws are irrelevant. If illegal immigrants can just hop over and say, you have to let me stay, I don’t really care what your immigration law is.

Leahy: This treaty was the 1951 United Nations Convention relating to the status of refugees. President Harry Truman in 1951 did not sign that because he felt it infringed on U.S. sovereignty. This is from your article.

In 1968, Lyndon Johnson reversed course and signed the protocol, and the Senate ratified it, binding the U.S. to its terms. The provisions were formally incorporated into a U.S. statute called the Refugee Act of 1980. But you say in your article, Truman was right not to sign it.

Krikorian: Truman was right because he chose not to sign it at the time – 1951 – because he viewed it as infringements or provisions of it as an infringement on U.S. sovereignty. And we resettled refugees between Truman’s decision and then LBJ’s getting us into that treaty, with Congress, passed legislation.

And we did it on our own decision. What happened in 1968 is we bound ourselves to these asylum provisions. But even then, it didn’t make that much difference because, how many people were sneaking across our borders and then saying political asylum in 1968?

It wasn’t seen as a problem – was only when the Cold War ended and transportation and communications around the world became dirt cheap, relatively speaking, and easy and quick. So now, instead of one ballerina from the Soviet Union defecting – which is what asylum is for, defections.

Now we’ve got 200,000 people a month coming across our Mexican border. Not from Mexico or Central America, but from Uzbekistan, Mauritania, Romania, and you name it. We got people coming from all over the world and saying, oh, I fear return. You have to let me stay and let me stay as a refugee.

And Europe faces the same problem. But you know, that’s their problem. They need to deal with it, too. We need to deal with our own problems. And that is not that we’re never going to give asylum to anybody, but that we need to set asylum rules based on the national interest. Based on what’s good for the United States and not based on some UN treaty.

Leahy: Mark, you reference in your outstanding article at National Review Online, a book written in 2011 by John Fonte called Sovereignty or Submission, which is about the struggle between national sovereignty and global governance. Now, I guess, was prophetic. The past 10 years have not been so great for American sovereignty.

Krikorian: No, definitely not. And this book, Sovereignty or Submission, deals with a whole bunch of things. It’s not about immigration. My point was that this issue of refugees and asylum fit into that broader push by these mainly left-leaning groups that see themselves not as citizens of their country.

Not as American groups or French or German or British organizations. And the people in them don’t think of themselves that way. They think of themselves as citizens of the world and they want there to be more and more rules that countries have to follow, whether their people like it or not.

Globalism is kind of the shorthand we use. This refugee treaty is an important part of that globalism push because the point of it is to limit more and more the control a country has and therefore the people of that country have over their own borders.

Because if there are rules set by the UN about who you can deport, who you are legally required to let stay in your country, even if you didn’t choose it, even if they came against you without your consent, then you progressively lose sovereignty over your own borders.

Leahy: I agree with your suggestion that we withdraw from the UN refugee treaty immediately. Let’s talk about the politics of this. What’s the likelihood that in the current Congress that a proposal like this would have any chance of success?

Krikorian: First of all, it’s the president, whoever the president is can withdraw us from a treaty. The way a treaty works is that the president and the people who work for him sign a treaty, negotiate and sign it, and then the Senate has to ratify it.

Okay it or not. If they do that, it becomes law of the land according to the Constitution. The president can then back out of the treaty on his own. He doesn’t need a vote for that. President Trump, for instance, and I’m pretty sure President Bush got us out of a couple of treaties because all treaties have a provision that says, if you want to get out of it, you have to send us a notice.

And then however much time, in this case, one year later, you’re then free of the treaty. Obviously, (Chuckles) President Biden is not going to be pulling us out of the treaty. So this is something that would have to wait until we had a President who was not just more in touch with his surroundings, but just generally speaking, ideologically and politically, very different.

Maybe, hypothetically, a President DeSantis might do something like that. But even then, it’s the necessary first step. But even then, just getting out of the treaty doesn’t free us from the UN provisions. We have to then change the legislation, the law, and that’s something Congress will have to do.

You’ll have to see what the makeup of Congress is at some point. It’s certainly not going to happen with a Democratic majority. It won’t happen immediately with the Republican majority potentially either, because this is one of the reasons I wrote the article.

And that is that no Republican politicians have submitted changes, proposed changes to the refugee law. So this is a discussion that I’m trying to move along. And this kind of, you’re addressing the issue on your show is one step in that direction.

Leahy: We’re talking with Mark Krikorian, the executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies. Mark, can you stay with us because when you come back, I’m going to ask the big question about the politics and your outstanding proposal that the United States should withdraw from the United Nations Convention relating to the status of refugees. Can you stick with us through the break?

Krikorian: Sure. I’d be happy too. Thank you.

Listen to the first hour here:

– – –

Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.
Photo “1951 Refugee Convention” by UNHCR. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bob Woodson Retires: Why He Left the Civil Rights Movement and the Search for His Successor

Bob Woodson Retires: Why He Left the Civil Rights Movement and the Search for His Successor

 

Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Bob Woodson, founder of The Woodson Center and 1776 Unites, to the newsmaker to discuss his recent announcement of retirement, why he left the Civil Rights movement behind, and what qualities he’s seeking in his successor.

Leahy: We are joined on the newsmaker line by our good friend, the great Civil Rights leader Bob Woodson. Bob, welcome to The Tenessee Star Report.

Woodson: I’m pleased to be here.

Leahy: First, congratulations on a fantastic career. You made news. Certainly, it’s well earned. But you made an announcement last week. You’re retiring after 40 years as head of the Woodson Center. What prompted you to make that decision?

Woodson: Well, age, first of all. And secondly, we want the organization to have a prosperous 40 more years. And therefore, succession is a key to that future. And so I want to prepare other young leaders to come in and take my place. We have a really deep bench, and we are excited about the future. I’m going to step aside. I feel like the adult kids, empty nesters. And you know, goodbye ain’t always gone.

Leahy: You’ve said something quite profound. I think maybe 30 years ago or perhaps even 40. You said, “I realized I was in the wrong struggle and the Civil Rights movement was beginning to morph into a race grievance industry.” When did that realization come to you, Bob Woodson?

Woodson: It came to me in the late 60s when we had picketed outside of a pharmaceutical company. When they desegregated, they hired nine Ph.D. chemists, and we asked them to join this movement. And they said they got their jobs because they were qualified, not because of the sacrifices of those on the picket line who were janitors, hairdressers, and ordinary folks.

I realized that, as Dr. King said, what good does it do to have the opportunity to participate if you don’t have the means and the where with all to do it? The Civil Rights movement never concerned itself with preparing poor people to take advantage of opportunities.

Instead, it concentrated on attracting resources to the middle class. And so I realized a bait switch game had been going on. We use the demographics of one segment of poor blacks as bait, and when the benefits arrive, it only helps those who are prepared.

And so I left the civil rights movement because it had morphed into a race grievance industry. And I began to work on behalf of low-income people of all races. The poverty programs came along and we spent $22 trillion, with 70 cents of that money didn’t go to the poor, it went to those who served the poor.

And so a lot of those Civil Rights leaders became Democratic officials running these cities. And they were the ones administering these poverty funds. So you have this huge classicism in the black community that no one talks about.

Leahy: That’s very interesting and quite a profound point. Last year, you started the 1776 Unites Project to push back against Critical Race Theory and the project – 1619 project in schools. Very divisive and very bad for America in my view. Tell us how that project has proceeded in the following year.

Woodson: Well, as I said, we pushed back. And since the radical left, I think, was using America’s birth defect of slavery and Jim Crow as a bludgeon against the country that got expressed in this 1619 Project.

Since they were using blacks as a messenger, we thought that the counter-voice should be black-led. And so I brought together a group of scholars and activists and journalists, and we produced a series of essays, about 28 of them with 1776 Unites.

And we were offering not a point-by-point debate, but a more inspirational and aspirational alternative narrative. In other words, the basic accusation is that many of the problems faced by low-income blacks in the crime areas and out-of-wedlock births are related to a legacy of slavery and Jim Crow.

That’s just a lie. And so in our essays, we talk about how, in the turn of the century, how blacks developed and built their own hotels and businesses and Wall Streets. They had $100 million dollars in real estate assets in 1929 in the city of Chicago and 731 businesses.

How schools were producing children who could read and write. And they closed the education gap between 1920 to 1940 within six months. We just were offering curriculum too so that school systems would have some counter-information and knowledge.

We have 15,000 downloads for our curriculum that celebrates America as really the country of opportunity, even for those who were enslaved.

Leahy: Now, let me ask you this, Bob. On what date will you officially be retired? Is it like, immediate?

Woodson: No, no, no. Nothing is going to happen tomorrow. We’re taking the rest of this year to search for my successor. In the meantime, the organization is prospering. We’re growing. I hope to name someone next year.

Leahy: Ah! So let me ask you this. In the search for your successor, what qualities are you looking for?

Woodson: I’m looking for someone of faith, someone who really loves and appreciates the richness of this country. We’re looking for people who are committed to looking at the strengths, the histories of resilience, people who understand. In other words, someone who is competent, loves this country, loves low-income people, and is forward-thinking, a visionary, and optimistic. Those are the qualities that we’re looking for.

Leahy: And how extensive will your search process be? And how many applications have you received so far to be your successor?

Woodson: We are not doing a national search as such. I mean, there are people who have been in this orbit walking with us over the past 30 years.

So we have a rich pool of people among those who we already know and had some experience with. The pool of people in this space are people already known to us.

Leahy: That makes sense.

Woodson: It’s just a matter of selecting which one will continue this message.

Leahy: When do you anticipate that process is likely to end? You’re staying in the gig full time until your successor is identified?

Woodson: Absolutely. I will be staying at the helm until my successor is named. I hope to when we identify someone who’ll work beside that person for a few months so we have an orderly transition.

But we will be making an announcement by the end of the year. We hope to be able to make an announcement and then perhaps a transition in the spring.

Leahy: Let’s say early January, your successor will be announced. You’ll work with that person for three months. And then April 1, when you officially retire, how’s your life going to be different?

Woodson: (Chuckles) Well, again, I’m going to step aside. I’ll be an ambassador. I hope to continue to lecture. I hope to teach and disciple my young leaders around the country as I do now. I hope to spend more time with my wife who has been very patient over these years.

I hope to just continue to offer a commentary. I want to continue to write a lecture and to disciple my young friends. But I want to step away from the daily administration. I want the organization to continue to move and to grow and allow new leadership to come in with new ideas as to how to expand our message.

So I’m looking forward to the next level of leadership and taking it to places that I never did. This organization is going to be around, and we’re going to be a fixture on the American scene, and we’re excited about the future. I’m just glad to be able to hand the baton to younger leadership.

Leahy: Bob Woodson, congratulations on a spectacular career and we look forward to having you back on the program. Thanks for joining us this morning.

Woodson: And thank you.

Listen to the full second hour here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.
Photo “Robert Woodson” by Gage Skidmore CC By-SA 3.0.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

400 Meter Champion and Team USA Member Cynthia Monteleone on Running Against Biological Males and Cancel Culture

400 Meter Champion and Team USA Member Cynthia Monteleone on Running Against Biological Males and Cancel Culture

 

Live from Music Row, Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – guest host Cunningham welcomed 400-meter world champion and member of Team USA Cynthia Monteleone to the newsmaker line to describe her experience running against transgendered males and the media’s refusal to acknowledge the issue.

Cunningham: We do have a guest on the line this morning, Cynthia Monteleone. Cynthia, am I pronouncing that correctly?

Monteleone: That’s right on. That’s it.

Cunningham: All right. Well, great. Thanks so much for joining us this morning. We really do appreciate it. You have got a very interesting story about how you and it turns out your daughter has been put in competition against men, so-called transgendered men, and you both have had to run against them. Tell us a little bit about the history of that.

Monteleone: I am a 400-meter world champion masters track athlete. I run for Team USA.

Cunningham: Wow. That is a tough race.

Monteleone: It is right? At age 45, I’m actually running faster than I did in college and still faster than all the high school girls in the state of Hawaii. So that’s great.

Cunningham: Congrats.

Monteleone: Yeah. But it takes a lot of hard work and determination to get to that point, especially as we age. I’m constantly training, and my specialty is metabolic health. That’s my job. I’m a metabolic practitioner.

I tell people what to eat and what supplements to take for performance and things like that. There’s a lot we know that goes into a good performance.

Cunningham: Yes. Yes.

Monteleone: In my 2018 world Championship in Malaga, Spain, I was running the 200 as well as the 400. And in my 200 heats, I had twice because they run rounds, I ran against this individual who I had researched because a good athlete researches their competition.

And I had discovered that they were openly a transgender athlete, male to female. Very large bone structure, large muscle mass. And so I started to raise questions as to the fairness of this issue and nobody wanted to talk about it.

It was kind of swept under the rug. I was actually told that for my own safety, perhaps I should keep my mouth shut, which did not sit well with me at all. And so, as you can see, three years later, I’m still not keeping my mouth shut. (Chuckles)

Cunningham: That is so strange. You see that so often where women bring up this issue and they’re met with almost anger at the fact that they would even bring it up. It’s just a weird kind of dynamic going on.

Monteleone: It is really really strange. And I was told that I was just being a sore loser and that’s why I was speaking up. And I said to that person, well, I’m sorry you didn’t get the memo, but I didn’t lose, actually. (Chuckles)

Cunningham: Great way to put it.

Monteleone: I managed to squeeze out a win against this person by a few tenths of a second. But honestly, you could tell that they were possibly not properly trained. And six months later, with more training and at a shorter rate, over hurdles, this person about 6’3 I would say, over hurdles, this person took a spot on the podium, a metal where my Team USA teammate should have been.

Just because this individual didn’t beat me doesn’t mean that it’s not an issue because with proper training, comparably gifted and trained athletes, the male athlete will always win. And so fast forward a year and a half. My daughter lines up for her very first high school race, which was last year.

She was in grade with a biological male identifying as a female. So it’s happened now to a mother and a daughter. And the mainstream media will tell you, it’s not happening. It’s not a big deal. It’s not happening.

Cunningham: It is happening. And thank you for having the courage to step out because it does take courage because you’re met with so much really angry opposition these days. It’s just amazing. This is not a rational discussion.

Typically, people are angry and they think that you’ve violated some kind of universal code. And it’s a very strange dynamic, and many people simply won’t speak up.

Monteleone: That’s right. We live in a society of cancel culture. So people are worried about losing their jobs and athletes are worried about losing sponsors. I am proud to say that all of my sponsors, immediately when people come up to me, have one of my clothing sponsors that is Directional Force.

I had a meeting with the owner, and the first thing I said to him was, listen, I speak up for fairness in women’s sports. And if that’s going to be an issue, I’m not going to wear your clothes. And this individual was like, oh, no, he said, absolutely. Please do. We are behind you 100 percent.

So I am lucky that I choose sponsors, and they choose me because they support what I do and who I am and not something like a large company that would cancel an athlete for speaking up because come on, this is women’s rights. And I work with a coalition that even has Democrat feminist groups.

This is across the board. It’s not a partisan issue. I don’t know why the current administration is polarizing this issue and making it partisan because it’s a women’s rights issue. And that goes across both parties. My daughter and I had a great visit to the Senate and Congress last week. The Senate and the House.

Cunningham: Great.

Monteleone: We were able to meet with lawmakers and share our story. The Independent Women’s Forum hosted us and we met with all the different representatives. I mean, dozens. And I got to be the guest speaker for the Republican Study Committee luncheon, which was fantastic. And we were very warmly received.

We were told that they were going to keep fighting, keep fighting hard. And that one of the hang-ups was that even though they knew that their Democratic colleagues who were athletes themselves and have daughters and granddaughters that are athletes, that they personally feel the same way and that they are just strictly voting on party lines right now. And this is really an injustice.

And it doesn’t represent their constituents, because when you see the polling even Democrats agree that males should not be competing in the female category. So like I said, it really shouldn’t be a touchy issue. It shouldn’t be a sensitive issue. It should just be science.

Cunningham: Absolutely.

Monteleone: They follow the science, but they’re cherry-picking what they want to follow the science on.

Cunningham: And it is nice to hear that some of the feminist groups are taking up the cause. You would think this would be an absolutely natural issue for them to advocate for.

Monteleone: Yeah. There are several. Wolf is one of them. But, you know, they’re being silenced, just like we’re being silenced. The media will not report on this. We had one major publication decline our story, and then two days later come out and say, this is not happening. There are hardly any instances of this happening.

And when I talked to Congressman Steube from Florida, he said that their office gets several calls all the time. I can’t tell you exactly the number. But I would say in the hundreds of stories where these girls and these parents are reaching out and they’re saying, hey, my girl also had to race a biological male, blah, blah, blah or compete against. So he said, I confirmed that. You’re right. It is happening all the time and no one’s reporting on it.

Cunningham: And for me, that really is not an issue. The fact that it is happening at all is the issue. Whether the trend is up or down or whatever, the fact is, it shouldn’t be happening. And anyone with daughters that are out there training hard and trying to be good athletes, this has got to be an issue for them. Any parent, grandparent that’s involved with daughters and granddaughters.

Monteleone: Let’s talk about safe care for our girls. Not only for my daughter’s case, but it was also her first high school race. She trained really hard. She came in second. The person she raced was ahead of everyone by about 50 meters.

Cunnigham: You are kidding me? That much?

Monteleone: Yes. And my daughter had trained since she was 11. She was actually the one that got me inspired to run again at age 40 after 20 years of not running at all. (Chuckles) She’s been training for years for this high school debut race. And this individual she raced had only started trying track two weeks earlier and was not properly trained in the 400.

Cunningham: Cynthia, we really appreciate you joining us. We have got to run, unfortunately. Thank you so much for your courage and your bravery. Willing to step out. Where can people contact you or get more information?

Monteleone: Iwf.org. They have a petition they can sign and a video of our story.

Cunningham: Thank you so much. And we will follow that. And hopefully, you can come back on and report some progress

Monteleone: Instagram is Fastover40 in case anyone wants to follow me.

Cunningham: Thank you so much, Cindy, I appreciate you joining us this

Listen to the full second hour here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.
Photo “Cynthia Monteleone” by Cynthia Monteleone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guest Host Ben Cunningham and AFP’s Grant Henry Impressed With Tennessee Legislature, Encourage Citizens to Reach Out and Get Involved

Guest Host Ben Cunningham and AFP’s Grant Henry Impressed With Tennessee Legislature, Encourage Citizens to Reach Out and Get Involved

 

Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – guest host Cunningham welcomed Grassroots Engagement Director of Americans for Prosperity-Tennessee Grant Henry in studio to discuss the proficiency of the Tennessee legislature, getting involved, and grassroots training offered by AMF.

(Andrew Cuomo clip plays)

Cunningham: That was the New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, trying to save his political career and life. Whether or not he will be able to is questionable at this point after the AG report came out yesterday. They didn’t charge him with anything. She’s leaving that up to the DAs.

I think there is one DA in Albany that is investigating, but the charges of sexual harassment or any criminal activity have not been brought yet. That was just a report which was pretty damning. And it’ll be really interesting to see how that plays out. He is trying to hold on.

I don’t know whether he will be able to at this point. There was some talk yesterday about impeachment proceedings. So real interesting, interesting political drama playing out there in New York and all among Democrats. (Chuckles) This is a Democrat state, and they will be hashing that out in the coming days.

It’ll be fascinating just as political bystanders to see what happens there. I think yesterday even the president said, yes, he ought to resign. So we’ll see what happens with that. We’ve got a little political drama playing out in Nashville.

Cameron Sexton, the speaker of the House, was on yesterday with us talking about the news conference that he and the governor and Jack Johnson and the commissioner of education had basically said to school systems, you guys got to get your act together and get kids back in school. There is a report that I guess it’s Speaker McNally.

Henry: That’s right.

Cunningham: In the Senate, it’s basically saying, hold on here. Let’s not rush into this. And that’s been fairly typical of the dynamic down at the legislature. Speaker McNally tends to be a little bit more of a slow walk on these kinds of issues and doesn’t join in sometimes.

But I think the governor is the one who calls a special session. So if he wants to call a special session, if these schools persist in masking up and staying remote. And the Democrats are really pushing back hard yesterday in Davidson County and Shelby County in saying we’re not going to go along with this, especially with the Delta variant.

So they were pushing back. It’s going to be really interesting to see how all that plays out at the legislature. The legislature is an interesting place. (Henry laughs) You’re down there a lot more than I am.

I used to be down there a lot, but I’m not. But you’ve got 132 people that you’ve got to kind of get going in one direction if you want to get something done. And, boy, it’s difficult to do sometimes.

Henry: Yeah, it absolutely is. And I will say out of the 132 people, I would say the overwhelming majority, if not every single one of them, that I’ve had the pleasure of interacting with wants nothing but the best for the state of Tennessee. And I say that sincerely Ben, honestly.

I’ve lived and done politics in several other states. Kentucky and Virginia. I’ve been around a little bit doing the political thing and I will say wholeheartedly those folks that have a true servant mentality in Tennessee are unlike any others. They really want the best for their constituents, for their state, and they want to lead the nation in liberty principles.

I truly do believe that. It is somewhat perplexing that these two men are not necessarily on the same page when it comes to how to approach this particular problem. But what do I know? I’m some random guy in radio and these guys are actually up there doing the job.

So I don’t know. We read the headlines and we see what they are. But like you said, I think ultimately it’s up to the governor as to whether or not to call a special session if need be. And we’ll see how that happens.

Cunningham: And they do react to the citizens and to the pressure of citizens. And you can call their office anytime. They’re not in session now. But if you feel strongly about this, you can call or go to the legislative website.

We do have a really good legislative website, and it’s fairly easy to find legislation to research. And you can go to the Tennessee legislature. Just go to Google and type in Tennessee legislature, and you’ll go right to it.

But they’ve got a good search where you can do searches on past legislation, on the code, on just about anything you want to. I think Tennessee legislative website has won several awards and they deserve it. It’s just a good, fairly easy-to-use website.

And their cold hard reality is not very many people ever interact with elected officials. That’s the cold hard reality. And if you do choose to interact with them, you’ll have an influence because you’ll be one of a very few people that ever do that.

Henry: Statistically speaking, that’s accurate as well. I said it yesterday, and it bears repeating today. The adage goes, we don’t have a democracy. We have a democracy of those that participate. Now, I get it. We have a constitutional republic. But you understand what I’m saying?

Cunningham: Absolutely.

Henry: Unfortunately, Tennessee has the second-lowest voter turnout of any state in the nation behind, I believe, Louisiana. Thank goodness for Louisiana. But it goes to your point statistically.

If you are involved, if you call your legislators, if you send them an email, if you go up there and meet with them personally, if you set meetings with them out of session, your voice is thereby amplified that much more than it would be in any other state because so few people are involved in the political process in this state.

Cunningham: And it is even more so at the local level. You go to most county commission meetings and you’ll see. Unless there’s some hot button issue like a dump area. Or a tax issue or something like that. Or zoning. Typically, there are very, very few people sitting there in the audience.

And, boy, I mean, it just makes a huge difference. If you go to these meetings, and you go up to the county commissioners afterward, you talk to them. You can have an extraordinary amount of influence.

And if you want to run for office, the county commission area, or the school board for $3,000 or $4,000, you can win some of these local races if you’re very strategic about choosing races.

Because people peel off of these bodies fairly regularly at the local level. I don’t know the statistics. I would guess, though, the turnover at these local bodies is more than it is at the state and the federal level.

Cunningham: And if you want to run for county commission, three or four grand and some shoe leather will get you elected – and going door to door.

Henry: (Chuckles) Shoe leather. Which is no small thing. I met with a guy, had done some politics out in California, and he was telling me in the county that they came from just a city council race alone, you’re talking six figures at a minimum.

A minimum of six figures to run for the city council race out there. So a couple of grand here, plus hitting the pavement, knocking some doors, I mean, hey, you can be a major influence in your area.

Cunningham: And speaking of grassroots, the young man is sitting across from me, Mr. Grant Henry with Americans for Prosperity is the grassroots director of Americans for Prosperity. It’s a statewide group that advocates and lobbies for free-market principles and have done some really great things in this state.

And you guys are always at the legislature every year. We want to talk more in this segment and the next segment about what you’re doing. But just kind of tell us, what are you working on and how you are looking forward to the legislative session that will be coming up in January of next year?

Henry: So we have two main things, I think, prior to getting to the legislative year next year. Two main things we’re focusing on right now, one of which we covered extensively yesterday, the – stop infrastructure spending, both the $1.2 trillion and oncoming $3.5 trillion infrastructure package.

We really want to do as much as we can to stop that. And again, big thanks to Senator Blackburn and Senator Hagerty for standing strong here. If you want to thank them personally: 202-410-2685. That number is a switchboard that takes you directly to them.

And just say, hey, look, I appreciate you guys for standing strong, and stand strong even more in this upcoming reconciliation bill. We’re really trying to get the word out. Tag those folks on social media too.

Let them know that you’re there and that you’re supporting them. They like to see that. And they do check that stuff. I promise you. And another thing that we’re setting up over the upcoming months here, Ben, is some grassroots training. And it’s exactly like it sounds.

We can tailor this training to what your specific group needs or we have a baseline, what we call Grassroots Leadership Academy training. There’s a couple of different things I’m trying to set up across Middle Tennessee, some of the southern parts, Middle Tennessee, maybe even up in Davidson County, if we can get enough people there.

But it kind of trains you to do what I do for a living. Figure out how to break down governmental barriers, figure out how to create a cause, figure out how to find organic social change entrepreneurs, and move that up to the legislature.

If you want to figure out how to do that in your area, here’s my personal cell phone number: 615-330-4569. Give me a call or just shoot me an email. It’s Ghenry@afphq.org. Trying to set up those grassroots training seminars.

Cunningham: It’s a great way to get people kind of over the hump.

Henry: It’s free of charge, too. No charge to ya’ll.

Cunningham: A little bit of nudging to get people to that comfort level. And that’s what AFP does such a great job on. They can do anything they want to once you train them. You’re not trying to corral them into something.

Henry: We just want them to take part in the process.

Cunningham: Yeah, absolutely.

Listen to the full first hour here:

– – –

Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.