Screenwriter Roger Simon Reminisces on the Day in the Life as a Former Yale School of Drama Student, Left Wingers and Trump the ‘Scorch’

Screenwriter Roger Simon Reminisces on the Day in the Life as a Former Yale School of Drama Student, Left Wingers and Trump the ‘Scorch’

 

Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed the founder of Pajamas Media Roger Simon to the studio to discuss what it was like going to school with left-wing famed actresses, writers, and activists and his take on the city kid known as Donald Trump.

Leahy: We are talking with Rogers Simon who is the senior political columnist for The Epoch Times, Academy award-winning nominated screenwriter, and also a very very good novelist. Roger, you grew up in New York.

Simon: Yes, and after college and graduate school I left for LA, but I grew up in New York.

Leahy: You grew up in New York and you went to Dartmouth. So like me, you’re a recovering Ivy Leaguer.

Simon: Slowly.

Leahy: Slowly. You and I worked together when you were my boss at PJTV, but I didn’t even know this about you. Very interesting. You went to graduate school at the Yale School of Drama.

Simon: That’s true. And it was kind of an interesting place then because it was right during the Vietnam war. So I had classmates who were writing serious anti-war plays.

Leahy: They were serious people.

Simon: Barbara Garson wrote this play Macbird which was a parody of Macbeth with Lyndon Johnson as Macbeth. All that kind of stuff is going right there and another woman wrote this awful play called VietRock.

Leahy: How original.

Simon: It became a big hit off-off-broadway.

Leahy: If you watched films and movies along with a lot of people who have been very successful in movies went to Yale School of Drama. The one that comes to mind of course is Meryl Streep.

Simon: Oh, yes. She’s the most famous. And Sigourney Weaver was there when I was there.

Leahy: Okay, we got to ask you. Were you hanging out with Sigourney Weaver?

Simon: A little bit. I was in the playwright’s program so I directed some of them because I would also direct. And Talia Coppola who was in The Godfather movies. Those are the two who were there that became a film star. Sigourney definitely a star.

Leahy: What is it that you do at a school of drama? I mean what’s a day like?

Simon: That’s a good question. because what I did was avoid being in the Vietnam War.  I got a student deferment

Leahy: But you have of course an interest in playwriting and an interest in writing. So you are out of Dartmouth,  did you go right to the Yale School of Drama?

Simon: Yes. And during that period if you were not going to school you went to Vietnam. I was a lefty I’m ashamed to say.

Leahy: You grew up in Brooklyn?

Simon: No. Manhattan. My father was a doctor.

Leahy: Of course, you’re going to be a lefty.

Simon: Shamelessly typical.

Leahy: I grew up in Upstate New York and I was probably shamelessly typical a little bit after you.

Simon: I wanted to be so left when I got to LA and hung out with Abbie Hoffman a little bit and like that.

Leahy: The late Abbie Hoffman. What kind of guy was Abbie Hoffman?

Simon: He was light-hearted and fun. I also hung out with Tom Hayden.

Leahy: The late Tom Hayden. He and ended up marrying Jane Fonda.

Simon: Yeah, and he was not fun.

Leahy: So it’s interesting you say that because some of these people on the left that are on these moral high horses and want to transform America are utterly humorless. That’s been my experience.

Simon: But there were a few back then who you know, Abbie had humor and Jerry Rubin. I think it would seem very forced now, they’re kind of humor. It didn’t make them solemn left-wingers.

Leahy: You’re a movie guy. What I think of the people on the left today the humorless nature. Do you remember the old classic Doctor Zhivago movie?

Simon: I loved it.

Leahy: And you remember the apparatchik guy who was in love with Julie Christie’s character, but then turned out to be utterly a politburo apparatchik without any remorse or any redeeming moral qualities. That guy.

Simon: Yes. That happens today so often it’s ridiculous And it’s sad. I think that’s the essence of a certain kind of leftism actually because you seem to be human and then it’s all about power.

Leahy: It’s all about power. That’s my take on it as well. At some point they start off with this concept of moral superiority and then it transforms in their mind into the acquisition and exercise of power. To me, that explains everything about what’s going on with the Democratic party today.

Simon: Absolutely and it’s anti-working class. Most of these people do not come from the working class. They’re from elite families or semi-elite families. It’s a stupid word really. It’s not about the worker. Trump was really the working-class president. Ironically the most working-class president in years.

Leahy: His father did have money but the thing about Trump which was appealing about him is he did every job in his father’s business. I mean he went in and he cleaned the warehouses. He prepared the houses. He’s a very detail-oriented kind of guy.

Simon: Oh, yeah. Here’s my take on Trump which is slightly different from other people because I am roughly his age and I grew up in New York. So I used to know guys like that. In the schoolyard, we had a word for a guy like that. We used to call them a “scorch.”

Leahy: A scorch. Roger, you know you always expand our vocabulary here. I’m dying to find out…

Simon: That’s not a fancy word. That’s a down-home word.

Leahy: Okay. What is a “scorch?”

Simon: Okay. I’ll give it to you. (Leahy chuckles) You’re playing stickball on the street And and a “scorch” is on a team with a Puerto Rican kid. The ball goes way out, a flyball, and a Puerto Rican kid drops it. The “scorch” starts counting and I’m not going to give you the real language here.

Leahy: It would be the language that would get us a complaint.

Simon: It would keep you off the air for two years. (Leahy laughs) So he hits the Puerto Rican kid. He uses bad terms that in the 1950s people used them and thankfully they are gone. But he would use them and the Puerto Rican would feel bad and then the game was over. And among the bad things is I’ll never talk to you again. You are a lousy outfielder. He said I’ll never talk to you again. You’re such a lousy outfielder. You’re the worst person who ever lived and a lot of bad words and then the games over and the two of them walk off arm in arm and buy some french fries. That’s the way it was.

Leahy: That’s a “scorch.”

Simon: That’s a “scorch.” It’s a city guy. And he’d have no bad feelings about Puerto Ricans the “scorch.” It was the “scorch” that would scorch him.

Leahy: He wanted to win.

Simon: He wanted to win and it was like what we call doing the dozens. He would take off on you as an Irish guy. You would be standing there and he’d say oh you are from Dublin. Blah blah blah.

Leahy: He would pick out whatever he could use when you made a mistake.

Simon: It would not really be racist or whatever anti-Irish or whatever it was. Because in those days people didn’t think that way. It was just more funning around. Of course, now the sensitivity level has gone to 150. (Laughter) But so that’s what Trump comes out of. And some of the attacks on him as racist I think evolved from that.

Leahy: He’s just a “scorch.”

Simon: He’s just a “scorch.” In fact, the reverse is true. He loved those people. But other people think of it as racism. It’s very weird. But that’s the way culture has evolved.

Leahy: And you are a culture guy since you do movies and plays and novels. You understand it. You look at it. Culture has gone so wrong.

Simon: Oh man.

Leahy: It’s gone so wrong. And the question is will get back to this after the break and tie it into some of our current events here. Culture in the form of oh, I don’t know and Oprah Winfrey interview of an American divorcee who married British royalty. (Laughter)

Listen to the full third hour:


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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special Guest Candace Owens Talks About Becoming a Nashvillian and Her New Show ‘Candace’

Special Guest Candace Owens Talks About Becoming a Nashvillian and Her New Show ‘Candace’

 

Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed conservative political commentator and host of the new show ‘Candace’ to the newsmakers line to talk about becoming a Nashvillian and her new show “Candace.”

Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker line by that great conservative Candace Owens who’s moved to Nashville and has a new talk show coming called “Candace.” if you’re driving into Nashville today, you can see the Billboards announcing the program. Welcome, Candace.

Owens: Hi!

Leahy: We are delighted that you’ve moved to Nashville. How do you like it here so far?

Owens: Oh, we are so thrilled. Actually, my husband had always wanted to move to Tennessee and this just ended up lining up. The stars lined up so we couldn’t be happier to be here. And what a perfect place to start a family.

Leahy: It is a great place. And of course, we love and I’m sure you’ll love the no state income tax. How about that?

Owens: That’s the best thing especially coming from Washington D.C. So that is what we call a perk.

Leahy: It sure is. So tell us, Candace, you are now part of the folks at The Daily Wire. I was over there a couple of weeks ago and had lunch with Jeremy the CEO. Great guy, great group. You’re launching a new talk show tell us about it called “Candace.”

Owens: Yes. I’m so excited. I’m actually going to be the first girl to join the guys over at The Daily Wire. So I get to break that up a little bit. And it was really such a creative process. Jeremy and I came together and said what sort of missing from the media spectrum. There’s a lot missing first and foremost. Obviously just allowing conservatives to be in culture has always been problematic.

But we also felt like we were losing sort of the late-night talk show greats. It kind of feels like it died with Jay Leno and now it’s sort of everything is so politicized and so polarizing at the expense of the conservative. So we thought why not actually do a live studio audience show that has a late-night vibe and sort of brings something unique to the culture at the same time. And bam! Candace was born.

Leahy: What a great idea I cannot watch any of the other late-night shows. They’re just unwatchable, unbearable. I turn it off within like two seconds of seeing it.

Owens: They’re also just not funny anymore. It’s like they’re trying so hard to be offensive and to do everything at the expense of more than half of America. They just sort of lost their touch and they seem to be angry all the time. And that’s not to say that my show is going to be all humor. Obviously, I think that I sort of sit somewhere in the middle.

I think humor is the best way to deliver it. Sometimes you just need to deliver the message. And we have so much going on and so many people that feel are unheard. and so to also deliver monologues that are meaningful and hopeful I think is also probably the most important adjective. Because a lot of people are feeling hopeless in today’s circumstances. But there’s plenty to be hopeful about.

Leahy: I like that hopeful angle. and you’re very right. These other late-night talk shows are just not funny. They’re just bad to watch. I think your program will be a big big hit. Now, you said something very important. You’re going to be taping this before a live audience here in Nashville. Is that right?

Owens: That is correct. And that is something that I think is so exciting.

Leahy: Just you and me here talking now. How can I get tickets?

Owens: (Laughter) You know what? I don’t know. I’m telling you there are so many things at The Daily Wire the other day. I was walking through the offices and a girl had on a Candace t-shirt, and I went where do I get one of those? The marketing department knows more than me about these things. But they will be announcing I think this week, you know, the first episode that we’re shooting is obviously a smaller crowd.

And then I think that by the end of next week, they’re going to launch a link live on the website where you can grab tickets. And now I guess we will be the required stop for every party coming in, every bachelor party, and every bachelorette party will say they’ve got to go for a live taping of Candace.

Leahy: Oh absolutely now, so this is going to come out once a week on Fridays, is that right when it comes out?

Owens: That is correct. And then we might scale up. We just have so many ideas right now that we’re so excited about. We’re already in our heads were 10 episodes out. We’ve already written so much content that we think inevitably we’ll end up scaling up the show but we are going to start with just once a week.

Leahy: So the late-night shows have writers do you have a group of writers working with you? So actually I write my own monologues. I am a writer obviously a published author and majored in English and journalism. So I love to write. But it is a collaborative process. They brought in some other writers to kind of go back and forth on ideas.

And that is just such an exciting process. I mean to be in the room and be talking about the topics that I say to them hey, I want to make this entire episode regarding this specific topic. And then we sort of you know, fit in the room and throw around a ball and laugh and come up with funny jokes. Just at one another. So it is a collaborative process but it’s being largely led by me.

Leahy: So Candace, here’s what I think. I think this is going to be such a big hit that you won’t be able to just do it once a week.

Owens: From your mouth to God’s ears.

Leahy: Take a look at me right? So I’m 66 years old. I remember listening to Johnny Carson. I remember listening to Jay Leno. I can’t listen to any of these other folks. I will watch your program and I will find it interesting and amusing. My guess is it’ll be informative but hopeful and funny. That’s what you need. That’s what you need.

Owens: Right. We just need to not take ourselves so seriously. And at the same time, there are obviously incredibly important issues that are going on. I’m so hopeful that we’re going to bring something really unique to listeners. And once again to just sort of say to the world that we’re not ashamed to be conservative. I think there’s this sort of this feeling that’s definitely like being pushed upon us by the mainstream media that we’re somehow not allowed to exist.

Leahy: Right.

Owens: And there’s so many of us. So it’s going to take a little bit of courage. And I want to always inspire that courage amongst my listeners and my followers to say, you know, I’m here, I’m Candace, I’m doing this unapologetically and you should too.

Leahy: So your Twitter account is @RealCandaceO. How can people get your program? Is it part of the daily wire subscription or is it going to be free for a while? How’s that going to work?

Owens: Yes. And you definitely want to subscribe to the daily wires? You can go to DailyWire.com/subscribe. You can use my code, which is CANDACE of course. And you are correct that you can follow bits of the show. We have an Instagram handle and a Twitter handle so you can follow me as you mentioned at @RealCandaceO. But you can also follow @thecandaceshow. And of course, if you follow me on social media, I’ll be pushing out so much content that it will be very hard for you to miss.

Leahy: So the first show is coming a week from today. It’s going to be released a week from today?

Owens: That’s correct.

Leahy: So what we’ll do is just you and me talking here. We’ll talk to Jeremy about this. Just send us a few clips of it like, you know before and we’ll play them on the show so people on the radio show will have an idea of the fun that’s coming.

Owens: So people have an idea of the fun. This coming absolutely will give you guys a little bit of an exclusive Tennessee deserves the exclusive everything’s happening in this state. so we can definitely make that happen.

Leahy: Why is it do you think that so many conservative media outlets and people are moving to Nashville, Tennessee and in Middle, Tennessee?

Owens: Because they’re being chased out. (Laughter) The policies of New York and LA are no longer desirable. It’s not a place to raise a family. Look at the crime rates that are skyrocketing. What you’re really seeing in these coastal cities is just a manifestation of these socialist policies. The socialist thuggery as I like to say that these Democrats come up with and people realize that you just can’t live like that.

It doesn’t work when you’re incentivizing criminality. It doesn’t work when you’re punishing people as law-abiding citizens. It doesn’t work when everything becomes an expense to the law-abiding taxpayer and everything becomes free to people that don’t want to pay taxes. People that don’t want to have borders and that don’t want to have rules. And so the people are fleeing. I think I read the other day that the top two states that people are running to are Texas and Tennessee. And we were itching to get to one or the other and here we are. I’m a Nashville resident and that just feels amazing to say.

Leahy: You are a Nashville resident and we are so happy. And you have a baby. You just had a baby.

Owens: I do. Yes, it’s crazy to think that. My son who is half English and half American is going to be raised in Tennessee. It’s just an amazing feeling. We always talk about that just being raised around people with good morals and people that I love this country. His name is Georgie. And he is only eight weeks old and he’s already a Tennessee resident. How cool is that?

Leahy: That’s very cool. You’ve been out there as a prominent Black conservative woman who’s just not taking any guff from the liberals and you’ve become a target. And you masterfully punch back in a way that is fun to watch. And that’s why one of the reasons why you’re so popular and why I think your show is going to be such a success. What has changed in your life now that your mom?

Owens: People ask that question and I think that the correct answer to that is that all of these topics just bear more weight to them. And what I mean by that is that you can obviously debate political topics just on the merit of the discussion. But when you have a child you realize that how we decide these debates.

You know who ends up winning these debates is really determining the future of how your children are going to be raised. I often ask myself is my son going to be raised in the same America that I grew up in? And really with the Democrats at the wheel, the answer is no. And so everything becomes so much more severe and you just want to give it your absolute all when it comes to informing listeners and saying to people this is really not okay where we’re headed.

And we need to sort of stop this train which is falling off of the tracks at the moment. So I definitely think these discussions have just become so much more real to us. And I definitely want to give it my absolute all to make sure that we don’t lose America and we don’t lose this country.

Leahy: When we come back after the break with Candace Owens we’ll ask the big question, which is did she watch the Joe Biden event last night, and what was her reaction? So Candace, think about that over the break. I’m sure you’ve thought about that quite a bit.

Listen to the second hour here:


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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State Rep. Michael Sparks Talks About His New Bi-Partisan Bill Making Amazing Grace Tennessee’s Official State Hymn

State Rep. Michael Sparks Talks About His New Bi-Partisan Bill Making Amazing Grace Tennessee’s Official State Hymn

 

Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Tennessee State Representative (R) Mike Sparks of Smyrna to the newsmakers line to discuss the motivation to introduce his bi-partisan bill which would make Amazing Grace into the official Tennessee state hymn.

Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker line by a good friend State Representative Mike Sparks. Last time we talked Mike you were in the studio. You had braved the sleet and the snow and the ice and made it into the studio at 5 a.m in the morning. It’s a little safer this morning than it was back then. but you are a brave man to make it through all that snow and ice.

Sparks: Yes sir I had a great time and I got stuck out front on music row for just a few minutes. The only fear I got here is if my coffee gets a little lower I’ll stub my toe here on my chair. (Leahy laughs) But I appreciate you having me in. I had a great time.

Leahy: Yeah, it was a lot of fun. So now you’ve got a very interesting bill that we want to talk about. Tell us about what you want to do here.

Sparks: Well House Bill 938 it’s asking for the hymn Amazing Grace to be an official state song or hymn if you will. A lot of folks at first glance may not think this is important. You see a lot of things that get in the news and sometimes I just shake my head at some of the things that the media covers. But I see the media a lot of time stirring up the pot trying to create a race war. Trying to create so many problems.

And that’s not an attack on 1510 or other stations. I don’t see that with you all. But I see the false narratives. I see what I call the agenda-setting theory. But where this originated at MTSU about four years ago I spoke about some of the histories to all the protesters out there at MTSU. And I just start talking about history. And I talked about John Newton who was a former slave ship captain.

He had a redemptive story, a powerful story of redemption. And he influenced the lawmaker named William Wilberforce in Great Britain and they fought tirelessly to end slavery. And it just shocked me that all these students that have a college degree or about to have a college degree didn’t know anything about history. And it’s just really surprising.

But was kind of cool and this is what I call this a God thing. the main protestor I’m talking to main Hellraiser. You just go to YouTube channel five and you could probably pull them up. He comes up with two frat brothers. He’s with Alpha Phi Alpha and he says representative is that why there’s William Wilberforce University in Ohio? And I said well, I would think so.

He said it was created by abolitionists. He said can I be your intern can I work for you as an intern? It was an odd question from the protester and I was like, yeah, let me check on this. And I checked around and somebody that interned a year earlier said  I think that young man is searching. I think he’s searching and didn’t really have a father in his life.

And so we just kind of connected. but I told him I said if you’re going to protest don’t do that crazy don’t be part of no buildings or tearing up police cars. And we just hit it off. And we got along great. and I just see the state of affairs in America that worry me and concern me as a Christian. I think that we got to get back to some basics and it’s not just me saying so it’s others saying it. That’s kind of the essence of the bill.

Leahy: And so how many states have state hymns. Do you know?

Sparks: I’m not aware of state hymns. There are 10 different state songs in Tennessee and very few of your listeners have probably ever sung any of them. I think Tennessee Waltz and Rocky Top. But this song right here almost everyone has sung.

Leahy: Let’s hear Amazing Grace here. We’ve got it ready to go. Here it is.

(Amazing Grace plays)

Leahy: And State Representative Mike Sparks. That’s the beginning of Amazing Grace sung by Tennessee’s own Dolly Parton. Love that song.

Sparks: Amen. Yes.

Leahy: So are you introducing this bill? Is it to become the 11th state song of Tennessee or is it to become the official hymn of Tennessee?

Sparks: Well, we have it written as an official hymn. and the idea for Dolly Parton and it really wasn’t even my idea my assistant who’s a young African-American guy he’s not but about 26, Marvin Williamson it was really his idea because we kept thinking who out there? Because I wanted to make sure I covered everybody like Elvis, Willie Nelson, Aretha Franklin, Richard III, Oak Ridge Boys, Alan Jackson, Garth Brooks, and the Memphis Spirit of the Memphis Quartet.

And I had a lot of famous people in here that’s mentioned in here as well as Dolly Parton. And my assistant brought up Dolly Parton. Another news source called me from Atlanta and I won’t say their name. But I didn’t really care to do the interview, but I just left them a recording and hopefully, they’ll be fair. But as I said the idea for Dolly Parton, it really wasn’t my idea. That was his idea.

Leahy: When you say Dolly Parton is Dolly Parton mentioned in this bill particularly.

Sparks: Yeah, it is. It just says Amazing Grace by John Newton and as sung by Dolly Parton as an official hymn of the state of Tennessee.

Leahy: Oh, okay. So it’s as sung by Dolly Parton.

Sparks: With the words and because I guess I’ve heard that there are different words that could be different in different ways people have sung the hymn. So we want to kind of nail that down.

Leahy: Did you see the movie that came out on Amazing Grace about 10 or 15 years ago?

Sparks: About William Wilberforce?

Leahy: William Wilberforce.

Sparks: Yes. It’s a powerful story these stories are powerful and stories that need to be told especially one that’s enriched with a strong conviction of John Newton. Because I had a choir come up and sing this about four-five years ago. And the story if you’ve watched the movie talks about John Newton being so bad that he could out cuss any sailor. And he was even sold into slavery himself and had to be bought back from his father. They sent a crew down to Sri Lanka if I’m not mistaken. But it’s a powerful story if folks want to know more just go to YouTube and type in Amazing Grace and Wiliam Wilberforce it should pop up.

Leahy: And by the way, I bring that up because there was a songwriter I think they were from Nashville who was commissioned in that movie to write a couple of new verses of Amazing Grace, which was quite a thing to do. Those new verses I thought were quite good. But what’s interesting to me and to ask you State Representative Mike Sparks is this. What sort of opposition is your bill to make Amazing Grace as sung by Dolly Parton the official state hymn of Tennessee? What sort of opposition is that bill receiving?

Sparks: Great question. None so far. But what concerns me is is the media because I’ve seen them create fake news. I’ve seen them lie. I shared with you Michael that I’m going back to school to MTSU to learn journalism to combat some of the fake news some of the false narratives out there. But I’ve always said, the good Lord will direct you if you really call on him. And at MTSU I’ve got to give Dr. Greg Reish some kudos. He’s with the MTSU Center for Popular Music. I reached out to him for some advice.

Leahy: The Center for Popular Music is a great center there at Middle Tennessee State University.

Sparks: They are. And I brought this up last year that I wanted to look at doing this. So this wasn’t some knee-jerk reaction. This was going back last year. But the book that he recommended me to get if anybody wants to get this, it’s called Amazing Grace: The Story of America’s Beloved Song by Steve Turner. Well, I didn’t know who Steve Turner was so I got the book and I started reading the back of it.

Well, Steve Turner had written it for Rolling Stone Magazine. But I want to give you a quote real quick Michael and you’ll trip out when you hear who this quote is from. It says, “Steve Turner is a tough-minded poet with an ear for the psalms and an eye for the miracles in the mundane and an understanding of how despair can break the ground for joy to take root.” Guess who said that?

Leahy: Willie Nelson?

Sparks: No. Bono.

Leahy: Bono!

Sparks: Yes, of U2. I went to YouTube pull it up and I just typed in Bono Amazing Grace and here’s where I got confirmation. Bono is singing Amazing Grace in Nashville, Tennessee. Now, I’ve reached out to Bono and sent a little email.

Leahy: Do you think Bono might be a little upset that it’s Amazing Grace as sung by Dolly Parton and not sung by Bono?

Sparks: He might. (Leahy chuckles) It’s sad we have to be aware that somebody will try to take something and turn it into a negative. That young man, that protester really, it was the hymn that connected us. I’ll argue that that hymn has probably turned more hearts and more lives around than any other song ever sang.

Senator Akbari out of Memphis is carrying it. She’s an African-American Democrat, so and I didn’t even ask her. She stepped up to do it. And Malik her assistant has been involved with it. And so I just want to thank Malik and my assistant Marvel Williamson for their efforts to be so supportive. They are a group of young believers.

Leahy: It sounds like it’s bipartisan.

Listen to the full first hour here:


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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.