Nashville Taxpayer Protection Act: Attorney Jim Roberts Talks Metro Legal’s Creation of Suppression and Fear as Referendum Seeks Ballot

Nashville Taxpayer Protection Act: Attorney Jim Roberts Talks Metro Legal’s Creation of Suppression and Fear as Referendum Seeks Ballot

 

Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed the Nashville Taxpayer Protections Act Attorney Jim Roberts to the newsmakers line to discuss Metro Legals shenanigans and efforts to prevent the referendum on the ballot.

Leahy: In studio, Crom Carmichael. On the newsmaker line. A good friend, Jim Roberts, the attorney behind the Nashville Taxpayer Protection Act. Well, twists and turns. Jim, where are we now?

Roberts: We are we now? Oh, we’re having a good time. Good time. So the latest news, of course, is we did turn in sufficient signatures. The Election Commission should have received those signatures and should be counting them. But we’re getting rumors and whispers of Shenanigans being pulled by the Metro government, unfortunately.

Leahy: Yes, shenanigans, Metro government. These are two words that are synonymous these days.

Carmichael: Did you file your lawsuit?

Roberts: We are going to file this afternoon. It’s already drafted. I’m working on a motion. What they are going to do is that they’re going to try to do is just not count the votes. That’s what the rumor is. That is Metro Legal’s strategy is to just say we’re not going to count the votes because we’re not even going to try.

Leahy: They are bound by law to count the signatures, correct?

Roberts: Well, you would think that. And so what Metro Legal has done is, we think is told the Election Commission just told them, oh, that’s not enough signatures. And so they’re putting pressure on the Election Commission we hear to just refuse to even count them.

Leahy: They can’t do that. That’s illegal.

Carmichael: Here’s what I think I hear Jim saying. This is why his lawsuit is necessary. His lawsuit is necessary to establish what is the definition of the general election.

Roberts: That’s right.

Carmichael: And then once that’s defined, then Metro has to count it because then the number would be set according to the legal precedent of the courts. The precedent is that the general election is the Metro election, not the election for Congress.

Leahy: Yeah. Describe for our listing audience what the charter says about the number of petitions you have to turn in 10 percent of the previous general election. The August 2020 local county general election had 120,000 votes. 12,000 is 10 percent. The November state and national election had like 320,000 votes. 32,000 is 10 percent. You turned in 14,000. Tell our listeners about what the charter says about what the preceding general election means.

Roberts: Well, I can actually make it even easier. The law is actually already set. Metro Legal litigated this against the Community Oversight Board. Two years ago and Metro Legal took a very strong position and the Court of Appeals adopted the position that the intervening federal election doesn’t count. It’s not to be counted. Special elections aren’t to be counted.

The only thing that counts as a preceding general election is an election for a county-wide office like the Assessor of Property, which is what happened last August. There were actually four general elections on our ballot last August, but three of them were special elections because of people who had either died or retired from office.

There was only one office and that’s the Accessor of Property, and only 92,000 people voted. So we really don’t even have to have 12,000 signatures. We only have to have 9,238 signatures. Everything Metro Legal and unfortunately, the Election Commission is putting out about a number greater than that is intent at deception and an attempt at voter suppression. So it is to suppress the people’s vote.

Carmichael: So you are filing a lawsuit that is a declaratory judgment lawsuit to define the definition or not to define it, but to confirm that the definition of a “general election” in regard to what this is about has to do with the local county and the last general county election.

Roberts: That’s right. And the law is very clear. And in fact, we’re even going to attach a copy of Metro Legal’s appellate brief. That’s the brief they filed with the Court of Appeals, where they argued that very issue. They even built a little table where they showed all the different elections and why they didn’t count. But I have a feeling they’re going to reverse themselves and shamelessly, try to create confusion, and really try to suppress this.

They don’t want this on the ballot. Let’s just get it straight. This means a lessening of power for the Metropolitan Government. And governments don’t like losing power. They want to keep that tax increase. They want to bring another tax increase. It’s already being floated that the taxes are going to go up again this year. And they know that if they try to do that at the same time, people are voting on this, that it’s just going to help us get the vote out.

Leahy: But according to the charter, when you turn in signatures for a vote to be held on an amendment to the charter it has to be counted by the Metro clerk. Am I right or not?

Roberts: Well, it’s certainly is what the law says. But when has the law ever constrained the government when it could get away with it? I mean, the fact that you have to sue the government to force it to follow its own laws, that happens when the government won’t follow its own laws. Metro Legal doesn’t care what the law is.

They don’t care that they took a position two years ago that said one thing. They’ll come in and change their position without hesitation because they’ll be told to do that by the Director of Law, Bob Cooper, who doesn’t care what the law is. He only cares what the result is. He doesn’t want people to vote on this.

Carmichael: And then the judge will have to rule whether or not the precedent and the definition of what the general election is. And then, Michael, at that point, let’s assume for purposes of discussion that the judge rules that the definition of the general election is the last county-wide election. Let’s assume then Metro will have to count the votes because the number that was turned in was greater than what the minimum would then be. They then have to do that. Now, their argument is that he needed to turn in 32,000, and he didn’t, so there’s no reason to even count. So Jim is now filing a suit…

Roberts: That’s exactly right.

Carmichael: To have the last August election, which was the last county-wide election to be the one that determines the total number of which 10 percent will be multiplied against.

Leahy: Jim, the Davidson County Election Commission, I guess, is scheduled to meet on Tuesday of next week. What do you think will happen during that meeting?

Roberts: Well, we don’t know exactly because, unfortunately, this is usually a sign of something dishonest is about to happen. They’ve announced the meeting, but they have not released the agenda. They are apparently going to hold their cards close to their chest of what they’re actually planning on doing. And that’s really why we’re going to go ahead and follow this lawsuit.

We want to get the law in the record in front of it. There are attorneys on the Election Commission that are smart. Jim Bolinas is one of the commissioners, and he is going to be smart enough, I believe, to read not only what the Court of Appeals said, but Metro’s position and realize that Metro is full of hot air. And I don’t think he’s going to let the Commission do something that just sets it up to get sued foolishly. This involves the Voting Rights Act and Civil Rights Acts. I mean, this is an intentional suppression of people’s voting and that’s a violation of federal law. And we’re going to push this.

Carmichael: You probably should reach out to the CEO of Delta (Leahy chuckles) and about voter suppression. I’m sure he’ll just jump right in and help you. (Laughter)

Roberts: Well, this is what it is. They don’t want this on the ballot. They don’t care about the mayor. They don’t care if it’s a good idea. And this is how corrupt governments work. And they just don’t let you vote.

Leahy: That’s right.

Listen to the full third hour here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.
Background Photo “Nashville City Hall” by euthman. CC BY-SA 2.0.

 

 

 

4goodgoverment.com Attorney Jim Roberts Says Download the Petition, Sign It, and Send It in Before March 25

4goodgoverment.com Attorney Jim Roberts Says Download the Petition, Sign It, and Send It in Before March 25

 

Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Nashville attorney Jim Roberts to the newsmakers line to discuss his progress with the petitions he’s received for the Taxpayer Protection Act referendum and urged listeners to send more.

Leahy: Well, the Nashville Taxpayer Protection Act petition is rounding third and heading towards home to tell us all about that, the guy that, a great attorney. Great friend, Jim Roberts. Good morning, Jim.

Roberts: Good morning, Sir. How are you doing this beautiful day?

Leahy: Well, the first thing we want to tell everybody is to go to 4goodgovernment.com. When they get to 4goodgovernment.com Jim, what can they do? What will they say?

Roberts: We need you to download a copy of the petition, get nine of your friends to sign and sign it yourself and send it in. That the deadline is approaching fast.

Leahy: Fast approaching, and you need 32,000 verified signatures to get this proposal. There are six elements to it. The one people will recognize most Jim is the turn back is that the right phrase turning back the 37 percent property tax increase that was pushed through the City Council about a year and a half.

Roberts: We call that the rollback. And we’re trying to roll it back. We’re not going to decimate the government as you hear some people crying. It’s really just to take us back to a prior year’s tax rate.  All they have to do is back off some of the extra spendings that they’ve been dumping on the taxpayers in these troubled times.

And so it will roll back to 34- 37 tax increase and enforce Metro to make some hard decisions and make some smart decisions going forward. Now, it does do other things that helps protect our parks, greenways, and public lands. It eliminates lifetime benefits for politicians. So it does more than just the rollback. You are right. That’s the most important or the most well known aspect of it.

Leahy: Now you can go to 4goodgovernment.com. download the petition. You and nine of your closest friends can sign it and then mail it in to the address on the website. That needs to happen now, doesn’t it Jim?

Roberts: Absolutely. The turn-in date is next Thursday. So we’ve got less than a week. And we need to match just for 32,000 that we need but honestly, we need to have a margin above that because the Metro doesn’t want this on the ballot. They don’t want people voting on this and they’re going to be nitpicking the signatures. And so you always want to have a few thousand more than you need just so they don’t get away with that or pull some shenanigans.

Leahy: Exactly. And so we’re counting. I’m guessing that we’re making progress, but we got to keep the metal to the pedal. Do I have an accurate description there?

Roberts: Absolutely. They’re coming in 500 a day, but our number is high. I mean, we need to get the 32,000. That’s a lot. No one has ever collected that many signatures from a ballot initiative. So we’re breaking some new ground here, and they’re coming in droves. But we need more. I mean, we want to have that margin. We want to have that comfort level. And if you’re serious about this, the citizens need to step up. This is the first step in fixing this problem.

Leahy: Made you kind of threw a curveball with that one week-plus of the winter weather where the mail wasn’t working properly or just were slowed down. And people just didn’t do much of anything. That kind of hurt the flow of signatures, I think. Would that be right?

Roberts: Oh, absolutely. We were very concerned that many of the petitions that we mailed out did not reach the citizens. And so that’s why we’re sort of really encouraging people from social media and radio to go ahead and download it. We know that a lot of them didn’t make it, and a lot didn’t make it back to us. So we were definitely set back by that. But we’ll keep pushing. And this is important. We want this on the ballot. And your listener should know just because you sign this in, mail it in doesn’t mean it’s law. We still have to have an election and vote on it.

Leahy: So the voters in Davidson County, you’ve mailed this out to a number of voters, I think most voters in Davidson County twice, right? Is that what the mailing situation is?

Roberts: No. We only made it one time. We decided to mail to all the voter households. So pretty much every household in Davidson County that has a voter in it received one of these. And so that’s their chance. If they’re a homeowner or a renter and they’re having to pay property tax, they have a vested interest and getting this under control.

Leahy: Exactly.

Roberts: And that’s really the issue here. It’s about a government that is completely out of control. And we’re just trying to rein them in. We’re not trying to end the government. As tempting as that sounds and reigning them in.

Leahy: This Thursday, 5:00 p.m. March 25 is that a hard deadline, or is there an opportunity to get an extension because of the weather situation?

Roberts: No. Unfortunately, it’s a hard deadline. The way the law is written, you have to pick a date and then back the turn-in date from that. And we felt like it was very important to have that election before Metro passes a budget this year. Because our fear is they’re going to come in and raise taxes again.

There’s been a lot of talk about that. Certainly, the mayor’s capital budget that he presented last month was just more and more and more spending. So clearly, it’s full spending ahead for the Metro Council and the Mayor, and it’s going to be even worse. So we wanted to get this vote before that budget was passed so that they would have to deal with it.

Leahy: 4goodgovernment.com. You can go there, download the petition, sign it, get 9 of your closest friends to sign it, put it in the mail, try to put it in the mail today, tomorrow, or Monday, and that will give him enough time. But probably by Wednesday or even Thursday morning.

Roberts: That’s right. We’re going to get the mail on Thursday, and we’re going to start boxing up the petitions at that point. But please, Monday is fine. And we’ll put on a website, my Street address. I’m in Midtown in Nashville. You can bring it by if you want to. But if you mail it Monday, it’ll be fine.

Leahy: What time does your mail arrive on every day?

Roberts: 10 o’clock.

Leahy: 10 o’clock the mail arrives. So let me picture your Thursday. (laughter)

Roberts: I’m always ready.

Leahy: Describe what your Thursday is going to be like, Jim, for us?

Roberts: We’ve got postal bins full of these petitions. We’ve got a pretty good rough count of the number of signatures, and it’s really about going down to the Metro clerk’s office. I have a handful of people help me carry these bends in, and we present them to the Metro Cork. And you say, here, check these in.

And in some ways, it’s very dramatic. In some ways, it’s sort of routine, but it’s you can make sort of a media event out of it. But the real issue here is getting these signatures in. This isn’t about me or some sort of movement. This is about bringing some fiscal responsibility to Metro. And if somebody doesn’t step up, I mean, the voters of Davison County, we’re going to destroy this city. And I think we all have this feeling that Nashville was slipping away from us.

Leahy: Yeah, exactly. So I have a sense, Jim there will be some drama Thursday morning. My sense is that probably when you wake up Thursday morning, your count will be probably a little bit over 30. This is my guess, a little bit over 32,000. You’ll be waiting for another 1,000 or so to come in. And if you step up there and you give them 33,000 signatures, that’s one feeling. But if you give them 40,000, that’s another feeling. And which one will make you more nervous?

Roberts: So absolutely. The closer we are to the number, the more incentive Metro will have to pull some sort of Dison the shenanigans to try to disqualify voters. So this is one of those situations where the petitions only have to have the signature, but the site has to be verified. That means you have to put your address on there, but it doesn’t say you have to put your address.

So what if someone didn’t put their address exactly right? Is that a valid signature?Is it not?I mean, we don’t want a lawsuit over this, but I can assure you that Metro is going to nitpick these petitions as hard as they can trying to keep it off the ballot. Yes, I would rather have 40 or 50,000 signatures so that they have less incentive to do that.

Leahy: So if you’re listing right now and you want to help Jim Roberts with his peace of mind over the next week (Chuckles) right now go to 4goodgovernment.com. Download the petition. Sign of it. Sign it. Get your best friends to sign it. Put it in the mail Monday. So you’ll have a whole bunch coming in Wednesday and Thursday.

Roberts: I’d appreciate it. And we’re going to do this for Nashville, and I really appreciate everyone’s help.

Leahy: Well, Jim Roberts, let me again salute you for being a good citizen of Nashville for taking all of your personal time to do this very important job. I know sometimes it may feel like it’s a thankless task, but I can tell you that I personally and every member of our listing audience thanks you Jim Roberts.

Go to 4goodgovernment.com and sign the petition. 

Listen to the full second hour here:


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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.

 

 

 

 

 

Attorney Jim Roberts Needs More Signatures for the Nashville Taxpayer Protection Act

Attorney Jim Roberts Needs More Signatures for the Nashville Taxpayer Protection Act

 

Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Nashville attorney Jim Roberts to the newsmakers line to give updates on petitions received and still needed for the Nashville Taxpayer Protection Act to get on the ballot.

Leahy: And on our newsmaker line now our good friend Jim Roberts talking about the Nashville Taxpayer Protection Act. The petition to get it on the ballot to roll back the 34 to 37 percent property tax increase in Nashville. On the web, you can download the petition at 4goodgovernment.com. Good morning Jim. How are you this morning?

Roberts: Well good sir, on this beautiful day.

Leahy: It is. So I’m looking at your website 4goodgovernment.com. And there’s a note there that says new 2021 petitions are in the mail. The filing deadline is March the 25th, March the 25th. That’s a week from this Thursday. You need 32,000 signatures. How is the count going so far?

Roberts: It’s going pretty strong. We’re bringing about 1000 to 1500 signatures a day, but I’m not going to kid you we need more. You want to have a margin over that 32 to 33,000 a minimum requirement. Those are valid signatures and not everybody who signs always knows what county they live in or whether they’re a registered voter or not. So there’s going to be a few that get kicked out. and so we would like to be able to turn in, you know, 38 or 39,000 signatures and maybe 40,000 if we can get them. And we’re not there yet, but we are making really good progress. But really it is time for people to get motivated and get those petitions to us.

Leahy: So we’re on track I think now to get pretty close to where we want to be or where you want to be so that you’ve got that margin of error. That margin above that 30 or so minimum to get on the ballot. As of now, it’s Friday, March the 12th, you’ve got a week in six days until the deadline. Where about do we stand right now? I know you don’t count them every minute. But what would be your guess as to the number of signatures you have at the of this very moment?

Roberts: We’re probably a little over 21 to 22,000, which is about where we thought we would be. we obviously hope we’d have more by this point, but there they are rolling in. What we’re seeing is that people are getting more and more signatures. And I encourage that. When we first got the petitions back they had one or two signatures on them because people were sending them back quickly. But now people are starting to get their friends and neighbors to find them and that’s what we want. Please please download that petition and get 10 of your friends to sign it and mail it in. That just makes it a lot easier on us or we’re counting petitions.

Leahy: Good point. When you get to 4goodgovernment.com you can download the petition and not only can you sign it but also you can get another 10 friends right to sign it.

Roberts: That’s right. That helps us more counting and also just helps us get those numbers quickly. And this and I just can’t think that the people know at least nine other people who would like to roll back this massive property tax increase.

Leahy: If you’re listening right now and you live in Davidson County and you haven’t signed this and you’ve sent a lot of petitions out in the mail and you resent them after this big winter storm that kind of made it a little bit more difficult to get these signatures. But right now if you’re listening you can go to 4goodgovernment.com. You can download the petition print it out sign yourself and then think about five to ten friends that you can get them to sign it and then mail it in. You’ve got a place to mail it in right?

Roberts: On the petition itself, it has the address and we’ll have our office address on the website pretty soon in case people get too close to the mailing date want to bring it by. But right now we’re asking people to download it and mail it. And 1,000 petitions a day are coming in and make yours part of that.

Leahy: So if we have what 13 days until the time you turn it in. If you have 1000 a day if you’re at 22,000 right now, but if you were to count every day that be 13,000 you be about 35,000 right now. That’s a little close for comfort, isn’t it if we had 35,000 when you turn them in.

Roberts: It would make me nervous. I’ll tell you what, but I think people are going to wake up. I mean, I think people are starting to understand that the deadline is approaching and this is in the citizens’ hands. I can’t walk around in person and convince every single person. I asked people to read this petition. It’s got six different things on there that limits or eliminates lifetime benefits for council members and mayors. That’s just one of the six. And then rolling back the taxes is just one of the six. There are other good things on here that will make Nashville a better city and more financially stable.

Leahy: And when you turn it in you’ve structured this petition so that each one of these issues will be addressed separately. Is that correct?

Roberts: That’s right. On election day there will be six different things that you can vote yes or no on. And if one of these that you don’t like maybe you want your Metro councilman to have lifetime benefits, you can vote no on that one.

Leahy: Now here’s something important. We want everybody in our listening audience, we want to make Jim Roberts less nervous, right? (Roberts chuckles) This is the Jim Roberts peace of mind effort, right? Go to 4goodgovernment.com and download the petition. Sign it and get your friends to sign it and mail it in this week or the or early next week so that we can give Jim Roberts peace of mind. It’s very important. Don’t you think so Jim?

Roberts: Absolutely. And remember, this just puts it on the ballot. We still have an election will still have to have a campaign for this and been educate people further. But if you want the chance to vote on it, this is the time to get moving. And I know that there’s plenty of people from Metro out there working against this. I know there’s a lot of misinformation provided. And it’s unfortunate, but that’s politics. But if you want to roll back this property tax and put some restraints on the Metro Government now is your chance.

Leahy: It’s one step at a time. And none of this good stuff to rein in Metro Nashville government will happen until you get all of the petitions in. That’s between now and March 25. So for somebody who wants good government in Nashville needs to go to 4goodgovernment.com and download the petition, sign it, and mail it in so that by a week from Thursday when Jim rounds all these up and turns them in that we’ll have plenty of margin over the 32,000 requirement. Right now we are sort of on a path to go around 35,000, but we want to give Jim some peace of mind. (Roberts chuckles) Let’s try to get it up to 40,000. Don’t you think it’s a good idea?

Roberts: Absolutely, and that’s what we need. They will, unfortunately, be emboldened to try to suppress people’s signatures. We saw this last time. And they’ll do anything they can to stop this and to prevent people from voting on it. And I would not put it past the Metro Government to disqualify valid signatures on a mere technicality or even just dishonesty.

Leahy: Yeah, but I think it’s probably likely to happen. That’s why you got to get over and get as many as you possibly can. Now walk us through what’s going to happen on Thursday, March 25th. The deadline is what 5:00 p.m?

Roberts: 5:00 p.m. We won’t wait that late of course. We’ll go over in the afternoon early and will bring these to the Metro Clerk and we basically hand them off to them when we get a receipt. But the Metro Court sends it a little silly system, but they send it in to the election commission and they start counting, and once they count they’ll certify it and it’ll be brought up at the next meeting and hopefully put on the ballot.

Leahy: Do you have a big van that you’ve de transport these in?

Roberts: It will fill the back of my van up pretty full. When you only when you want 30,000 something signatures, you’re going to end up with 15 to 20,000 petitions because a lot of them come in with signatures on them.

Leahy: When you bring this to the county clerk, are you going to give them a little note? Attached, please find 36,000 signatures or 40,000. Do you give them the number or what do you you know because you’re counting them all along the way? What do you tell them exactly?

Roberts: They actually make you sign a form that says how many signatures you think you’re turning in which I think is sort of funny. And so there’s a little receipt that you get ironically. And there’s no place on it for your name or address or anything. I guess you just have to assume you’re famous enough when you turn a man that they know who you are. (Leahy chuckles) Which I thought was sort of funny. I don’t consider myself famous.

Leahy: But there will be a number that you attach to it on Thursday afternoon, March 25 when you get all these petitions in the back of your van and drive them in there, and are you gonna need somebody to help you unload them?

Roberts: We’ll have a group of people up there. We’ll bring in our volunteers and we hope to have a nice crowd out at the courthouse. Well, we’ll send photographers for that Jim. So the number right now, we’re around 22,000. Our guess is we’re on a track to get 35,000, but we’ve got to get 40,000. So go to 4goodgovernment.com.

Roberts: That’s what we really want.

Leahy: We want 40,000.

Roberts: And understand this is a remarkable number. This is a huge number of signatures. Unfortunately, our bar is very high.

Leahy: Very high. Jim Roberts 4goodgovernment.com. The man Behind the Nashville Taxpayer Protection Act. Thanks so much for joining us today.

Roberts: Thank you.

Listen to the full second hour here:


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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.
Background Photo “Davidson Courthouse” by Reading Tom. CC BY 2.0.

 

 

 

 

4goodgoverment.com Attorney Jim Roberts Says Download the Petition, Sign It, and Send It in Before March 25

URGENT: 4goodgovernment.com Attorney Jim Roberts Updates the Tennessee Star Report on Taxpayer Protection Act Petitions

 

Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Nashville attorney Jim Roberts to the newsmakers line to give updates to how many petitions he has received for the Nashville Tax Payer Protection Act and asked folks to please get theirs in as the deadline looms  March 26.

Leahy: Now Jim Roberts with 4goodgovernment.com with an update on the Nashville taxpayer protection act petition. Good morning, Jim.

Roberts: Good morning, sir. How are you doing on this beautiful day?

Leahy: It’s a great day. How are we doing with signature collection on the petition to get this Nashville taxpayer protection act that will roll back the 34 percent property tax increase? How are we doing on that petition?

Roberts: Petitions are coming in 1,500 to 2,000 a day. we still have a way to go. I would encourage your listeners to please download that petition, get their friends and neighbors to sign it, and get it back to us because we want to have a comfortable margin when we turn them in.

Leahy: So go to the number 4goodgovernment.com. That’s for good government.com. You got to get to 32,000 signatures by what March 26? Is at it that’s three weeks from today. Is that right?

Roberts: Basically, yeah, we want to try to turn them in that Wednesday, I believe. And we need 33,000 valid signatures, which means you want to collect more than that because some of them might not be good. But we’re getting closer to the wire.

Leahy: So here’s the big question for you Jim. Here’s the big question. How many signatures do you have as of Friday, March 5? How close are you to 33,000?

Roberts: Well, we’re halfway there and they are and they’re coming in stronger. I mean they’ve been out for a while in the mail but was slowed by the snow but they’re coming in about 2000 a day. And my worries were a little closer than I’d like to be. So, please everyone gets get those petitions to get them back to us.

Carmichael: Can you send out another mailing Jim?

Roberts: We’re thinking about that. We’re thinking about that very strongly and maybe sending out another mailer on Monday just in case people didn’t realize what they were getting when they got it. You know, we know that Sabathia we’re getting notes on about every fifth edition seems like have a nice note on it too. It’s almost thank you for doing this. We just got to get this on the ballot or taxes are going to go up again this year.

Leahy:  So you say you’re a little over halfway if you need to be 33,000. I’m going to say that you’re at least 17,000. Would that be right now? That’s probably a little under. We only count them about every two or three days. I’ll be honest.

Leahy: Because it’s a big process to count them.

Roberts: It is because you have to cut them open just people tape on clothes and cut them open. So they’re coming in droves. It very warms my heart how many people are turning these in but time’s running out. A sense of urgency needs to be on everybody’s minds.

Leahy: So am I right that March 26, three weeks from today is the deadline?

Roberts: It’s Thursday that we want to turn them in. I guess that’s the 25th.

Leahy: The 25th. So we’ve got two weeks and six days and to get them in. If you’ve got 1,500 a day, you’ve got, you know, probably about ten days 15,000 you’re going to be pushing it. You’re going to be pushing it to get to that 33,000. You got to accelerate it.

Roberts: That’s right. And that’s why we’re pushing harder and harder with more media and social media. And I think people are just sort of asleep at the wheel a little bit not realizing this is out there and we want to get it in. We want this on the ballot. We want people to have a chance to vote on not just the roll back of the property tax, but the other five things on the list that ending lifetime benefits for elected officials and protecting our parks, greenways and public lands. I mean this thing does a lot more than just roll back the tax. I know that’s the most important to a lot of people. But these really are good government elements.

Leahy: On the web at 4goodgovernment.com. You can download the petition you can get not only your own signature but up to ten total people on it.Crom wants to weigh in on it.

Carmichael: If you do another mailing, I’d try to get get the word urgent on the on the on the on the front.

Leahy: Urgent! Urgent!

Carmichael: Words like that matter. They get people’s attention.

Roberts: Our response was so overwhelming the first time that I think some people just sort of sitting back thinking, well other people will do it. It’s time for people to get real serious.

Leahy: Jim Roberts with the Nashville taxpayer protection act doing you’re doing great work out there where you appreciate it go to  4GoodGovernment.com. Download the petition sign it and mail it into Jim. Thanks so much for joining us today.

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio