Mayor of Maury County Andy Ogles Talks Tennessean Frustration and Transgender Bathroom ‘Campaign’ Bill

Mayor of Maury County Andy Ogles Talks Tennessean Frustration and Transgender Bathroom ‘Campaign’ Bill

 

Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Maury County Mayor Andy Ogles in the studio who discussed the growing frustration of conservative Tennesseans and the transgender bathroom bill.

Leahy: We are joined in studio by our good friend Andy Ogles, Mayor of Maury County. That bastion of freedom in Tennessee. Now, speaking of freedom, I can’t wait. I got to hear all about this. MuleFest is coming to downtown Columbia this Friday. (Deep voice) Trace Adkins.

Ogles: That’s right.

Leahy: Trace Adkins. I can’t do that voice.

Ogles: No.

Leahy: Only one person can do that voice.

Ogles: Trace Adkins is distinct. So we went to this little restaurant a few weeks ago, and, of course, he’s a big fella. He’s kind of hard to miss.

Leahy: He’s like 6’4? 6’5?

Ogles: Something like that. So you are hanging with Trace.

Leahy: And Scooter is saying, you know, he’s really good pals with Trace Atkins.

Scooter: What I tell ya? I feel like it.

Leahy: He can feel it. So you’re hanging with Trace? (Laughs)

Ogles: One of the nicest people that you’ll ever meet.

Leahy: And he lives in Maury County? Where does he live?

Ogles: He actually lives in Williamson County and during COVID and the way that Davidson and Williamson and some of the other more liberal counties bent over to COVID (Leahy laughs) he came down to the bastion of freedom.

Leahy: Bend over to COVID. (Laughter) No, that’s a good phrase. You are on a roll with phrases today Andy Ogles. (Laughter)

Ogles: Oh me. My filter is off. He’s got his back to the restaurant or to most of the people in the restaurant and then he speaks. Then just, you see, basically every head in the restaurant turn.

Leahy: They know. So there he is. You hear him speak. It’s Trace.

Ogles: Its Trace.

Leahy: So now how did you become pals with Trace Adkins? What’s the story there?

Ogles: Well, during COVID, he started coming down to Maury County and just kind of fell in love.

Leahy: And what’s not the love in Maury County, though?

Ogles: Well, I’m biased. I grew up in Franklin. My wife and I did a dated in high school.

Leahy: Increasingly Liberal Williamson County.

Ogles: Well, it was very rural back in the day. A lot of people see Franklin today, and it’s a cool town, don’t get me wrong, but it’s not the town I grew up in. It was kind of a Mayberry community, very rural, with a lot of cow fields and pastures.

But Franklin outgrew us, and we moved further South. My great-grandmother was born in Maury County in 1904. My grandmother 1924. So I had roots in Maury County. So it was familiar. And our son passed away a few years ago, our third child.

And if there’s ever a time when you’re going to do something kind of radical, because if you had asked us prior to that, would we ever leave Franklin? I think the obvious answer would have been no.

But we’d always talked about buying a place a little slice of heaven, raising the kids on the farm. And it was that moment we took inventory of life and said, you know what, if we’re ever going to do this, we need to do it now. And we did. And we’ve never looked back.

Leahy: And let me just put a little caveat on that characterization of Williamson County because I live in Williamson County, the people who live in Williamson County are largely conservative.

Ogles: Oh, sure. Yeah. Absolutely.

Leahy: The leadership of Williamson County, I’m talking about you, Williamson County School Board. This is me, not you. And the leadership in the County tends to be more Liberal. That’s just the reality of it.

Ogles: There was a Mom’s for Liberty meeting at The Factory.

Leahy: We covered it.

Ogles: And I don’t know the official count, 350 to 400 people showed up.

Leahy: Big crowd, basically talking about, in general opposing of the imposition of Critical Race Theory in the curriculum of Williamson County schools.

Ogles: That’s right. And let me tell you, so the moms, in particular, are disproportionately women. I was at the meeting, they’re fired up. And I think you’re going to see, of course, we mentioned MuleFest, but we kind of move past it and we’ll come back to it.

Leahy: We’ll come back to MuleFest. We got a full hour.

Ogles: That’s right. Well, I think there’s the potential across the state of Tennessee. And I’ve been traveling the state quite a bit here lately, primarily between Knoxville and Jackson. So the edges of East and West.

Leahy: The edges of East and West.

Ogles: In Middle Tennessee, and there’s a lot of angst, there’s a lot of frustration. And pretty much wherever I’m going going to speak, it’s 100 and 250 people showing up on a Tuesday or Wednesday or Thursday night, and they are frustrated.

And so I think you can see across Tennessee something building that if you have a candidate that’s primaried, whether it’s school board or County Commission or Alderman or state rep, that you’ll see a wave, a change over against incumbents.

Leahy: And that’s at the local level because in many cases, the local school boards have gone woke.

Ogles: That’s right. And I think there’s this, again, this sense that the legislature, we have a Supermajority in the state of Tennessee, hasn’t done enough and hasn’t taken the necessary measures to protect our children from a whole host of issues, whether it’s LGBTQ curriculums or transgender issues or CRT. Only 34, 35 percent of kids read on the level in the third grade. We’ve talked about that before.

Leahy: Which, by the way, you would think, Andy, that would be the job of the Tennessee State Department of Education to make sure that, oh, I don’t know, kids at the third grade, 100 percent would read at a third-grade level.

Ogles: Right. But what we’re doing is we’re pushing wit and wisdom, which is the foundation of CRT.

Leahy: I think isn’t a big champion of that Penny Schwinn, the Commissioner of Education?

Ogles: Yeah. Well, and that’s the irony of the CRT bill in the state of Tennessee is that the enforcement mechanism against CRT say, in Nashville and Shelby counties, Memphis is the person who’s laid the groundwork for CRT in the state of Tennessee.

Leahy: What I think is likely to happen is the following. I think after this school year starts if the governor signs the bill, which sources tell me he will.

Ogles: Yes, I think he will.

Leahy: I think he’s not signed it yet. But if he signs it, and the bill basically says the enforcement mechanism for any school system that violates these tenants is to withhold money.

And the person who designs that is Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn. She’s going to be loathed to do that, frankly. So what I think is going to happen is she won’t enforce it. We’ll see.

Give her the chance. But then the General Assembly would come back in, generate and they’re going to have to fix it.

Ogles: I think I think you’re right. I think the governor will sign it because it’s a half measure, like so many other pieces of legislation that he signed this year.

There are a whole bunch of do-nothing pieces of legislation. So there’s no downside for him to sign it because it actually doesn’t accomplish anything now.

Leahy: Didn’t he just sign this big anti-transgender bill. Or is that a half measure, too?

Ogles: Oh, it’s certainly a half measure, because rather than banning that altogether the way we should.

And I think I made the comment two weeks ago. If you’re a dude in a dress, you’re still a dude. Go use the men’s restroom.

Leahy: If you are a dude in a dress, you are still a dude.

Ogles: That’s right. And look, it’s a free country. California has the right to be Liberal. I have the right to be conservative. You want to wear a dress, wear a dress. Free country. You’re not using the bathroom with a little girl in Tennessee.

What we’ve done and they’re calling it a bathroom bill. But all it requires is for the business to put up a sign. So basically, what you’ve done is codified that a man could use the restroom with a little girl.

Leahy: They’ve codified that unless the local business puts up a sign of opposing. Is that how it works?

Ogles: Well, again, it’s one of these grey areas.  If you’re going to address an issue such as this, why don’t you actually address it instead of skirting around the edges so you can campaign on it?

And that’s all this is. This is a campaign bill versus an actual bill that does something, and he needs to be called out on it.

Boy did we veer off of we started with Trace Adkins and MuleFest. And here we are, dabbling.

Leahy: The coffee is good, though. It’s the early morning. And I keep telling our listening audience the way the best way to experience this program is, this is a three or four-person conversation every day.

Ogles: That’s right.

Leahy: I have a conversation with you. We sit here and we drink our coffee. And our listening audience, they’re getting up, and they’re saying, I wonder what Mike and Andy, you’re gonna talk about today.

And so they’re drinking their coffee, and they’re saying, well, that’s interesting. I wonder where this is leading.

Ogles: (Laughter) You just never know.

Listen to the full second hour here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.
Photo “Mule Fest 2021” by Beth Zaunbrecher.

 

Maury County Mayor Andy Ogles on Corporate Wokeness and How Tennessee Needs to Follow Florida’s Lead

Maury County Mayor Andy Ogles on Corporate Wokeness and How Tennessee Needs to Follow Florida’s Lead

 

Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Maury County Mayor Andy Ogles in the studio to talk about the corporate wokeness and its disregard for their constituency and how other states need to act now and follow Florida’s lead.

Leahy: You are a small business guy. I think Alfredo Ortiz made quite a case there. (Laughter) It was kind of funny right?

Ogles: Oh, my goodness. As we sit here and talk about this billboard, I was trying to think of a funny quip. I’m usually pretty good at that. And I’m speechless. Sometimes we say things in jest and we lighten them up a little bit. But he’s really talking about something serious that wokeness that is sweeping the country. It has a dangerous, ugly side to it in that it’s ready, fire, aim. And we’re no longer processing things through an objective lens. That suddenly everything’s tainted.

And that’s problematic. Could have should have the All-Star Game been evaluated? Well, of course, that’s what you do in any business model. But just to pull it a knee-jerk reaction because of Coca-Cola and Delta, these woke corporations trying to push. They’ve become oligarchs now where they are pushing their agendas onto the American public. But because they have such a market share we don’t have a voice.

Leahy: It’s a very good point. When we grew up, the idea was, well, this is a capitalist society. And businesses were in business to make a financial return for their shareholders and do a good job in providing products and services to their customers. That’s the model that’s being replaced now by a concept called stakeholder capitalism.

I call it basically an early version of Marxism. What’s happening is these large publicly traded companies, the left is trying to turn them into, like, public benefit corporations. And they are making decisions not based upon their products or services or what their customers need but what the left activists are trying to push them into. It’s a very bad sign.

Ogles: And the problem is that most of us we’re busy with jobs, mortgages, and kids and we’re trying to figure out life. And then you’ve got this minority, this small portion of the left. They’re loud, they’re angry, and it terrifies these corporations. And so they’re moving in directions that their constituency really doesn’t want.

Leahy: Their customers don’t want, their investors don’t want. But these stakeholders are basically a bunch of left-wing Marxist types that want a version of neofascism in the United States. There’s a lot of words but that I think describes what they’re trying to do. They’re trying to serve the authority of state legislatures around the country.

Ogles: Yeah. They totally bypass. For example, the Tennessee legislature, they’re not going to do some of the things that Coke or Delta or some of these other companies are suggesting. And so what are they doing? It’s a run around you and I, as we try to say, hey, wait a minute. We value the Constitution. We’re governed by elected people, not by corporations.

And because you’re Coca-Cola and you have such a large market share, now you have a disproportionate voice and telling me how to live. Look, I don’t care what Coke thinks. I really don’t. Make soda, do it well, and be gone. That’s it.

Leahy: Yeah. I think I’m going to stop drinking Woka-Cola myself.

Ogles: Woka-Cola. That’s almost as good as that billboard.

Leahy: All strikes and no balls for the Major League Baseball Commissioner. The thing is, when you look at that, you look at the social course, as you know, 2nd Vote, our friends Amy Wilhite and Chris McCarran are the executive director and CEO of 2nd Vote. They rate large corporations based upon whether they’re neutral or conservative or liberal.

The vast majority of large corporations now are pretty liberal in terms of their policies, and it’s just not what they should be doing. And people are pushing back now when you talk about as a consumer, you look at that. If I tell you I’m not going to drink Woka-Cola, okay. If you like to drink Colas, there are a few less woke versions of it. Pepsi-Cola is sort of in that crowd, not quite as bad as Woka-Cola. Royal Crown Cola.

These are all kind of politically correct. There is this thing going on in American capitalism, and you’re a student of economics Andy. There’s a thing going on where all of these big funds that manage all the money that invest in corporations are pushing the publicly traded companies to do something called ESG. And it’s a big code word. It’s for the environment and social governance. In other words climate change and equity, diversity, all that kind of stuff. And there’s huge pressure on these publicly traded corporations to kind of comply. Not a good sign, I don’t think.

Ogles: No. And that’s why it’s imperative that our state legislators and the legislature step up and do something about this. You had Senator Mike Bell in the first segment, and there’s the opportunity to follow Florida’s lead and to push back against some of this Big Tech censorship, kind of draw a line in the sand if you will. And they’re going to study it for another session.

Well, the time is now to act. And so I would call on the legislature to go ahead. I sent a letter to the governor, the speaker of the house, and to the lieutenant governor saying, we have to stand up collectively as a state in the same way Florida has done. And that’s the other thing that’s important is we need these legislatures, these governors from conservative states to work together to be a chorus of conservatism because that’s what the left does. And they do so well.

You’ll have these factions of the left that otherwise would never want to be together because they’re so distinctly different. But yet when it comes to fighting against conservatism, they are one voice and they move and they march together. And then you get here on the conservative side, we’re too busy bickering as to which one of us is the most conservative.

Leahy: I’m more conservative than you.

Ogles: That’s right. Ron DeSantis is out there getting it done. And in Tennessee and Texas and some of the other states. We’re a little tepid.

Leahy: Lagging behind.

Ogles: That’s right. You look at the election, the lawsuit that the Texas attorney general filed. Tennessee, we finally signed on, but we were like 16th out of 17th by the time that we signed on. It was so far in the process, it was irrelevant. We should have been tagalong beating on the door to say, no, we’re next. We’re next. We’re going to file, too. So that way, if your lawsuit doesn’t work and we have one. And so we as a state, as elected officials, we’ve got to work together and be a chorus of rationalism in a crazy world.

Leahy: You said something very interesting and very important. There is leadership, I think, going on in the conservative world, and it’s coming from the state government. But particularly there’s one state I think that’s leading the way. And there’s one governor who’s leading the way and that’s Ron DeSantis in Florida.

Ogles: Going back to the baseball analogy, he’s knocking it out of the park. I mean, he really is. I mean, if you’re a conservative in this country, man, do you wish you had Ron DeSantis as your governor or perhaps as your president.

Leahy: Now you use the baseball term. You know, the story about Ron DeSantis?

Ogles: He’s quite the ballplayer. From Yale?

Leahy: He was the captain of the Yale baseball team and hit 345 his senior year. I never even in high school, I never even got close to 345. So this guy’s pretty good. He’s a very talented guy. And that’s one of the reasons I think since last you’ve been here, we have a little bit of news. The Tennessee Star and our parent corporation is Star News Digital Media. And we have the Star News Network. We do state-based conservative news in now seven States. And we have added, wait for it….drum roll, please. The Florida Capital Star.

Ogles: There you go.

Leahy: Up next, The Texas Loan Star.

Ogles: That’s a good one. Again, if you’re a conservative publication, the state that’s really helping drive conservative content is Florida. So it makes absolute sense to have something like that there. But again, they are leading the charge, knocking out of the park as I said.

Leahy: That was our thinking as well. And so far, the stories that have been great about conservative leadership from a governor and a state legislature down in Florida.

Listen to the full broadcast here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio

 

 

 

 

 

 

Managing Editor of Project Veritas Nick Givas Talks Twitter Ban and CNN Exposed

Managing Editor of Project Veritas Nick Givas Talks Twitter Ban and CNN Exposed

 

Live from Music Row Monday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –host Leahy welcomed Project Veritas’s Managing Editor Nick Givas to the newsmakers line to talk about their recent Twitter ban after releasing a video exposing CNN’s technical director brag about rigging and manipulating its viewers against Trump.

Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker lined by Nick Givas, the Managing Editor of Project Veritas. Nick, welcome to The Tennessee Star Report.

Givas: All right. Thanks for having me.

Leahy: So James O’Keefe has been banned from Twitter one day after your stunning expose of the technical director of CNN who basically said what everybody knew that they were trying to defeat Donald Trump. Will James O’Keefe be suing Twitter and CNN, as some reports say?

Givas: Yes, it appears that we are going to go forward and seek our remedy in court. That’ll play out, obviously over the weeks and months ahead. But it appears that we’re going to go on offense and forge ahead with that.

Leahy: Now, James O’Keefe’s and the Project Veritas Twitter account had what, one and a half million followers?

Givas: The Veritas account may have. That was suspended before my time in joining the group. But James’s personal account was close to a million followers and was over 900,000.

Leahy: Wow. And so it looks to me like if Twitter finds a conservative that they don’t like, they just ban them. What on earth is going on with Twitter?

Givas: I can only speculate into the mind of what Jack Dorsey is thinking. I do not know. But I can say that for the grace of God and for your listeners because eventually, I believe it seems we’re on a slope or it’s not just conservatives that are going to get banned it’s anyone that gets in the way of a narrative that gets in the way that Twitter doesn’t like. you don’t have to be conservative. It could be anyone.

Carmichael: Naomi Wolf certainly is not a conservative and she was banned from Twitter.

Leahy: Yes. She has been.

Carmichael: Now, quick question. You said that you think you’re going to also in addition to suing Twitter sue CNN. What is the basis? I know that you all have exposed CNN.

Givas: Defamatory statements are the basis and I’ll leave it at that.

Carmichael: Okay, so CNN has made statements that you all believe are defamatory. And is that prior to or after your recent exposure of CNN’s deception?

Givas: I can only say stay tuned. (Leahy laughs)

Leahy: This is a wise man. There is litigation going on.

Givas: Ongoing. Ongoing.

Carmichael: Well, you have many people in your corner on your ongoing litigation. So anyway, good luck to you.

Givas: Thank you, sir. We try for the truth. That’s all we want.

Leahy: The claim by Twitter was that James O’Keefe was using fake Twitter accounts. Is that true, or did they just make that up?

Givas: He tells me no and I’ve seen and experienced nothing like that. I’ve never seen James keep or operate a false account. He says he’s never done that. I wouldn’t be surprised if it was just a reason to throw him off. But again, we’re trying to figure that out. And the answer we were given was very broad and it seemed very random all of a sudden.

         As I said, I’ll leave it to the American people. l’ll leave it to them to decide why this happened and the timing. But yes, we’ve come out with three bombshells videos showing a CNN technical director bragging about how the network is propaganda, how it manipulates people, and how it was basically shilling for Black Lives Matter. And then all of a sudden he gets banned.

Carmichael: I found what you all got them to talk about with them exaggerating the numbers on COVID.

Givas: That too. And then saying they’re going to pivot from COVID, and this is Charlie Chester, a technical producer there, claiming the network knew that people are tired of COVID and now they’re going to switch to climate change as if it’s Wheel of Fortune or some game show for them.

Carmichael: For them it is.

Givas: At least Charlie Chester, this director, and his claims that the culture is such. Let’s find out. Let’s see if anyone else is there that wants to come forward and they can send any information to Veritastips@protonmail.com. And if it isn’t just him, more people will come forward. They will and it isn’t the first time.

Leahy: Nick Givas, you’re the managing editor of Project Veritas. What does the managing editor do at Project Veritas?

Givas: Without getting into too much detail I can say that I work with production on videos sometimes. What we’re going to keep and what we’re going to actually publish. Sometimes we get information that might be borderline that we have to decide as a team, are we going to publish this? Is it newsworthy? Is it true?

A part of that includes traveling on the road. Part of it includes talking to find people like yourself and just giving interviews. But people know where we are at as much as we can tell without blowing the cover of our people or interfering with their work. And in addition to that, it’s just anything and everything. I try to just work to help the company as much as I can to expose the truth. And part of that also involves things like this. We’re releasing stories such as this because we feel it’s in the public’s best interest.

Carmichael: I have a question for you that I’m just asking for your best guess if you choose to make a guess. If The New York Times produces 100 different stories and each of those stories is based on an unnamed source, how many of those stories do you think are based on a legitimate source and how many do you think are based on either no source at all or a friend of a friend of a friend who is the so-called unnamed source?

Givas: Well, that’s what we hope to find out with this lawsuit through depositions and discovery. And through this lawsuit, if we’re able to look inside The New York Times for the first time or have them answer honestly perhaps we’ll start to find out how many of those sources were real.

Carmichael: That’s right. You have a lawsuit.

Givas: We do.

Carmichael: What can you tell our listeners, if anything about that lawsuit? Because I know that you won at the New York State Supreme Court.

Givas: Yes we did. We got past the motion to dismiss and that does start to open the other side up to having to become involved in the process. The New York Times responded. We were kind of going back and forth on this so far but we do plan to have depositions, and we will depose members of The New York Times that were involved in this particular story before the court. And after that, I think the public is going to learn quite a bit about a media that they’ve trusted for years that has now decided to go into business for itself and not protecting the people and we are going to show why.

Leahy: The Project Veritas groundbreaking approach to journalism kind of addresses that problem of sort of unnamed sources, because you have pioneered the use of undercover videos. So this technical director, this Chester fellow at CNN, cannot deny what he says, because you got it there right on video.

Givas: There’s power in that. It’s visual. It’s not filtered through a lens or corporate advertisers or someone else’s opinion. It’s right there in black and white. And, yes, there is a certain power to that I think that you don’t get with digital media, or print news, or even cable news.

Carmichael: Didn’t you all win a lawsuit years ago, or somebody sued you, claiming that your method…

Givas: We’ve never lost.

Leahy: Never lost! Nick Givas, Managing Editor of Project Veritas, thanks for that first-hand report of what’s going on with that Twitter ban.

Listen to the full third hour here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Network of Enlightened Women-Nashville Chapter President Allison Santa Rita Talks Challenges on Being a Conservative at Belmont University

Network of Enlightened Women-Nashville Chapter President Allison Santa Rita Talks Challenges on Being a Conservative at Belmont University

 

Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed the president of Belmont University’s Nashville Chapter of the Network of Enlightened Women to the studio to discuss the bias and challenges she and her chapter of conservative women face on campus.

Leahy: We are joined in Studio by Allison Santa Rita. She’s the president of the Nashville chapter of the Network of Enlightened Women. Good morning Alison.

Santa Rita: Good morning. Thank you so much for having me. It’s so great to be able to be here especially after being followed by our founder Karen Lips. That’s incredible.

Leahy: So you’re a student at Belmont?

Santa Rita: Yes.

Leahy: Where are you from originally?

Santa Rita: I am originally from around the area of Indianapolis, Indiana.

Leahy: Great place great place. I had friends that lived in Carmel, Indiana. That’s a nice little suburb isn’t it Indianapolis?

Santa Rita: Absolutely. They were actually our rival in school.

Leahy: Where’d you go to work to get high school?

Santa Rita: I went to Noblesville High School. So I went to a public one.

Leahy: So who won?

Santa Rita: Caramel. (Laughter)

Leahy: So what brought you to Nashville? Why did you choose it?

Santa Rita: I had always wanted to go into the entertainment or music industry and Belmont just seemed like the perfect place to do that. And also who doesn’t want to live here in Nashville during college?

Leahy: I would agree with that and by the way, we’re talking off-air that my wait for my first cousin twice removed. That is the granddaughter of my first cousin who is going to be enrolling at Belmont. She’s got a scholarship to play sports there. So we are delighted to have her here in town. Extend the Leahy family here in Nashville. And so you’re part of the Nashville family now.

Santa Rita: Yes, absolutely. I quite enjoy it. (Chuckles)

Leahy: It is a nice place, isn’t it to be a college student?

Santa Rita: Oh, absolutely. I mean it’s not just the opportunity to really do whatever you would want, whenever you want. But also especially as a music student, it’s incredible to be able to go make those connections at the writers’ rounds that they have almost every single night throughout the week. Which is absolutely incredible.

Leahy: So you’re majoring in music?

Santa Rita: So I’m majoring in the music business with an emphasis in business.

Leahy: Interesting, interesting. So the Network of Enlightened Women educates the next generation of women leaders on conservative principles. So are you the next generation of women leaders on conservative principles?

Santa Rita: Yes. Absolutely. At least I hope so. and especially on our college campus. I’m sure a lot of people are worried about their children or grandchildren going into college. And I think it’s super important to have organizations such as the network of enlightened women to help keep us grounded and keep us on track with our beliefs. And it’s incredible what they’re doing and I really do think they are producing the next round of conservative women who are going to stand up and fight for our beliefs throughout these next couple of years.

Leahy: So how many members of the Nashville chapter of the network of enlightened women are there?

Santa Rita: Yes, so we have about 100 women.

Leahy: Really? See now I’m impressed. I mean I was already impressed. But now I’m really impressed.

Santa Rita: Yes. We love it. We noticed that we do have 100 women who are signed up and they do stay active with events that we have. But then we have like about 40 women who are just so active and they are absolutely incredible. And they’ve joined committees. They do social media takeovers for us. They help with social media or really any aspect that they have the opportunity to jump in and be active they do it.

Leahy: My question to you is, are conservatives and particularly conservative women isolated on the campus? Do you get a lot of negative feedback from various folks?

Santa Rita: Yes. Absolutely. One story. There are so many stories but one is that we have a Twitter handle, not directly related to Belmont. They say they’re not affiliated but it’s all Belmont students and it is incredibly toxic. And once two even three times a week, they will make it a point that conservatives are not welcome on campus.

Leahy: Really?

Santa Rita: Yes.

Leahy: Well, but that’s just a Twitter account. But tell me the rest of the story.

Santa Rita: What they do is they have probably a group of people that for sure go out when we are on campus and they’ll take videos of us and try and ask us questions. Or if I go out and put QR codes on tables and say hey would you like to join our community? Tell them a little bit about it. Within the next hour, all of those QR codes will be removed from the whole entire campus. And they were actually tweeting about it and they said conservatives are not welcome on this campus. You have no Community here. and not that you don’t have a community, but we don’t want you to have one.

Leahy: But these are just students right?

Santa Rita: Yes.

Leahy: What’s the administration do there?

Santa Rita: They do not care.

Leahy: They don’t do anything to defend you.

Santa Rita: Nope. Not at all. In fact Network of Enlightened Women does not have an actual chapter at Belmont because they said that we are not allowed to have a national advocacy organization anymore on Belmont’s campus. But we’re not. We’re a 501 (c) (3) non-profit.

Leahy: So that’s their excuse, that you can’t have national advocacy groups there?

Santa Rita: So what actually happened is we applied last fall semester and they were just coming up with excuses like oh reformat your bylaws, do this do that. And so I had gone on for about three months of redoing stuff and trying to keep in contact. And every time I would ask, just excuses. Then the next semester rolls around which is this semester and I said, hey, what’s the update? We have some incredible women who want this to be a Belmont chapter. And they said, I’m sorry, we have changed the rules. We are no longer allowing national advocacy programs.

Leahy: Was that basically to keep you guys from having a chapter?

Santa Rita: I believe so. 100 percent, but I can’t confirm.

Leahy: So if we had somebody from the Belmont administration sitting here, what would they say about you and your conservative group that just wants to have an opportunity to be on campus like every other group out there?

Santa Rita: So I’ve had conversations with them and all they say is you know, we had to change those rules because we’re trying to keep it local.

Leahy: So you are not local apparently. The chapter of a national group is not local is that the new standard?

Santa Rita: Apparently so.

Leahy: Well, but why are you paying these guys’ tuition if they’re so mean to you?

Santa Rita: Absolutely.

Leahy: That’s a serious question. Why spend a lot of money with these people that don’t like you because you actually have a point of view that they don’t approve of?

Santa Rita: Yeah, so that’s a great question. Though at the end of the day I’m there for an incredible music opportunity to learn from some really great professors who most of them are a little bit like-minded with me. Which is incredible.

Leahy: Shh, don’t tell anybody that. (Whispers) You might get them in trouble.

Santa Rita: I’m not going to name names. (Chuckles)

Leahy: Good.

Santa Rita: But that’s okay because those that are not like-minded are very vocal to us.

Leahy: So the professors that are not like-minded Are they mean to you? What do they say? Do they say, you know, get out of here? Are they a little more muted in their conversations with you?

Santa Rita: So there are professors on campus who will not allow conservatives to write about conservative topics because we have to get them approved on papers.

Leahy: You mean in a class?

Santa Rita: Yes.

Leahy: As a normal part of submitting papers in the class? So they’re constraining freedom of speech in their classes.

Santa Rita: Absolutely. (Laughs)

Leahy: This is academic freedom gone haywire.

Santa Rita: And we try to fight it. and there are some people that are working on stories about it. The best we can do is get our voice out there tell our stories and really talk about what is happening. But at the end of the day, I am there for a music degree. And sadly the music industry does not agree with a lot of my beliefs.

Leahy: Well, that’s probably true. So you get the music degree and then you go out into the music industry. And do they hate conservatives too or is it a mixed bag?

Santa Rita: I’d say it’s a mixed bag, especially on the business side you might have a little bit more of the conservatives. But in the actual industry, you’re probably going to be stuck with some not so like-minded people. But you know as a conservative I find it very important to surround myself with those of opposite views. I think that’s incredibly important especially as a student

Leahy: You see liberals don’t do that.

Santa Rita: 100 percent.

Leahy: I mean if you’re a liberal you gotta you can only talk to liberals. You can’t even entertain the thought from a conservative. What’s it like psychologically for you and your fellow members of the Network of Enlightenment Women Nashville chapter here in Belmont? What percentage of your fellow students in the administration are just actively trying to undermine what you’re doing and try to be mean to you?

Santa Rita: Yeah, I don’t know the exact percentage but it feels like a lot. I would definitely say we are the silent majority. So those that are vocal or not conservatives normally. So it really does feel like about 70 percent of the campus is trying to get us. So it’s really tough at times. One of the things we have really have focused on in the Network of Enlightened Women is Nashville’s community because we realized…

Leahy: Internally with your folks? How do people get in touch with you?

Santa Rita: They can get in touch with Network of Enlightened Women-Nashville on Instagram. And we kind of reply to our DM’s and we make sure that we are I’m staying active with them.

Leahy: Alison Santa Rita thanks. The president of the Nashville chapter of the Network of Enlightened Women. Good luck and keep us posted. Ad let’s hope the administration at Belmont starts to be a little bit nicer to you guys.

Santa Rita: I hope so too.

Listen to the full first hour here:


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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.
Photo “Allison Santa Rita” by NeW. Background
Photo “University of Belmont Campus” by the University of Belmont.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21 in ’23: Leahy and Huey Talking Elections by Marketing Smarter, Organizing Better, and Getting out the Vote

21 in ’23: Leahy and Huey Talking Elections by Marketing Smarter, Organizing Better, and Getting out the Vote

 

Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed creator of the Huey Report and direct mail expert, Craig Huey, to the studio to strategize a way for conservatives to take back Nashville’s Metro Council and other local government positions.

Leahy: In the studio, California Refugee and marketing expert Craig Huey. Craig, just you and me here talking.

Huey: Okay.

Leahy: Do you think we can put a plan together so that common sense takes back the Metro Council here in Nashville in August of 2023 when the elections are up?

Huey: Michael, let me tell you a secret. A secret that is very important. If you are able to activate a small group of people in the Nashville area the answer is absolutely. you can take over the city council. You can take over the mayor’s job. You can take over the school board and it is something that can be done because it’s replicated throughout the United States by people who are able to organize.

And if you take a look at what the left does and if you take a look at what the Socialists do and you take a look at what they do, they’re doing things right. They are doing things with modern technology and data. And conservatives and Republicans are normally looking at it from 20 years ago. They’re marketing as if it wasn’t 2021.

Leahy: That’s where we are. It’s 2021. I have an idea here. I got a phrase here. And I talked to Steve Glover about this yesterday. He feels there are 40 members of the Metro Council. And 30 of them are liberal lunatics.

Huey: Yes.

Leahy: And they don’t have any comments and they do stupid things. Yes, everything they do stupid. Stupid stupid stupid. And there are about 7 to 10 that are moderate to conservative who have some level of common sense including Steve Glover Metro Council Member At-Large. So five members of the council are elected at-large in the entire metro Davidson County Nashville area and the 35 districts, right?

So right now the mix is let’s say 30 left-wing lunatic nut cases and then 10 common sense people right now. And that may be a little bit generous on the common sense. But let’s go with that. So elections are in August of 2023. Steve Glover thinks that we can can take back 15 of those 40. And I think that’s probably realistic. But I’m going to give you a phrase here. Let’s see if this works. 21 in 23.

Huey: I love it.

Leahy: You like that?

Huey: I love it.

Leahy: That’s vision. 21 in 23. I like that idea. So what that means is 21 of the 40 members of the Metro Council in the August could be not left-wing lunatics, but people with common sense and who are moderate to conservative. 21 in 23. Just you and me here talking. So this is a grand vision. How do we get there?

Huey: You get there by understanding that the key is identifying your voter and getting them out to vote. And that’s what started with Obama and moved ahead.

Leahy: The original community organizer.

Huey: Oh my goodness he was great.

Leahy: As a community organizer. Not so great as a president.

Huey: But he was great at mobilizing people revolutionized marketing and advertising for politics. And he was able to get out the vote like never before. And so what they did at that time has been perfected. You saw it in Georgia with Stacey Abrams and being able to organize people to turn Georgia. And they would like to do that here in Tennessee.

And basically what we need to be able to do is identify who our voters are and then when the election comes get them to the polls. It sounds easy but it’s not. It takes leadership and takes organization and it takes understanding how to collect that data and that’s what they’re good at. They know how to identify who their potential voters are and they’re able then to create a database of who those are. And so they know who’s interested in crime.

They know who’s interested in schools. They know who’s interested in the homeless problem. They know all these different things. And so Mrs. Jones, they know that she’s really interested in education. So when they go to her and they talk about we’ve got to improve education they are able to communicate on her level and then make sure that she goes to the poll.

So they register and they get out the vote. And they’ll go up to her and they’ll say it election day! Have you mailed in your ballot? Can I help you mail in your ballot? Can I drive you to the poll? And then you know, okay, you’re going to go on your own. Well, I tell you what, right after the election the next day I’m going to come back to your house. I’m going to say how did it go voting? They found that it increases turnout 10 percent. The Democrats have this whole plan of how to identify and mobilize. That’s what we have.

Leahy: Not only do they have that. They have a myriad, every city in the country has a myriad of nonprofits funded by left-wing billionaires and donors where people can do this. People get paid to do this. It seems like just about everybody if you look at these 30 left-wing lunatics of the 40 members on the Metro Council board right now, they all seem to have some level of connection to either being a teacher, a union, or some kind of nonprofit, and they’re able to devote a lot of their time to this level of organization because left-wing billionaires spend their money like crazy. Whereas on the conservative side, conservatives are a little bit less generous with their money supporting the cause. That’s what I’ve found.

Huey: You are 100 percent right Michael. That’s why we have to market smarter, organize better, and get out the vote.

Leahy: Trouble brewing here for the bad guys here in Tennessee if we put this 21 in ’23 plan together.

Listen to the full second hour here:


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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio