State Representative Scott Cepicky Weighs in on Tennessee Department of Health Commissioners Monoclonal Antibody Guidelines

State Representative Scott Cepicky Weighs in on Tennessee Department of Health Commissioners Monoclonal Antibody Guidelines

 

Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Maury County, Tennessee State Representative Scott Cepicky to the newsmaker line to discuss the recent guidelines released by the Tennessee Department of Health’s Commissioner Lisa Piercy and urged Governor Lee to circumvent the federal government so Tennesseans could receive the treatment.

Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker line by my very good friend, State Representative Scott Cepicky from Maury County. Welcome, Scott. Thanks so much for joining us on such short notice.

Cepicky: My pleasure, Michael. Good morning, everybody.

Leahy: Can you help us unravel this statement yesterday from Lisa Piercy who is the department of health commissioner that was talking about the guidelines for monoclonal antibody treatments?

This is a very effective treatment for those who test positive for COVID-19. She said that for people who test positive, you have to test positive to get the treatment. Then she said the new thing is the National Institute of Health criteria.

Even if you test positive for COVID-19, but you’re vaccinated, you don’t get it. (i.e. the monoclonal antibiotic treatment.) Now, what on earth did she say? Does it make any sense? Can you help unravel that for us, Scott?

Cepicky: I don’t know if I can help unravel something that’s impossible to understand. I think you have to look at the beginnings of all this.

Ever since coronavirus hit the continental United States, most of our leaders, the CDC, have been wrong in their diagnosis, including our own department of health who has been very misguided in their programs to help control the spread of a virus that’s really uncontrollable.

It’s going to go where it’s going to go. But now we get this thing with the Biden administration, and this is where it all started Michael. When the Biden administration came out with an order that we’re going to start the rash in the monoclonal antibodies.

And instead of sending them to the state that we’re using them the most to treat patients to help them get over COVID, they wanted to treat all the states the same, even states that really weren’t using them that much and giving them all the same allotment of the monoclonal antibodies. So we’re now in certain states, these are sitting on the shelves, not helping anybody.

Leahy: That’s crazy.

Cepicky: To where we could be using them here in Tennessee. And like you said, I represent Maury County. Maury Regional Hospital.

Well, on average, was treating about 70 patients a day with the monoclonal antibodies, treating them, and then sending them home and they were fine and getting over COVID. That numbers down to around 19 because they just don’t have the monoclonal antibodies to give out anymore.

And so people are coming in who are sick and right now are being turned away because they don’t have the antibodies to give them.

Leahy: So here’s my question to you. Why can’t Maury County hospital go directly to Regeneron or Eli Lilly to make this stuff and buy it and just circumvent the federal government? Why can’t Governor Lee do that? What are your thoughts on that?

Cepicky: That is 100 percent accurate. That is one of the things that we’ve been talking about in the halls of Cordell Hall up in Nashville, encouraging Governor Lee to talk about that and go ahead and bypass the federal government contract directly and get these monoclonal antibodies from the manufacturer so we can make sure the people of Tennessee have the best medical care available to them.

And that’s one thing we’re going to encourage immensely with our governor and with the Department of Health. They have the money to bypass the federal government and do what’s right for Tennessee.

Leahy: Has the governor responded to that request? What do you think? What has he told you?

Cepicky: From what I understand through the back channels is that that’s being looked at right now, trying to bypass the Biden administration. And let’s make one thing clear here.

This is the Biden administration who’s targeting Tennessee. They are targeting red states right now. He made a statement the other day and a singled Tennessee out for the way our governor is responding to his executive orders.

Tennessee is being targeted by the federal government. They’re trying to make life as difficult as possible for us, and we are not going to stand for that. We are going to defend Tennessee to the best of our ability.

Leahy: Why does it take the governor more than 24 hours to make this decision? If he’s got the money, why doesn’t he place the order with Regeneron or Eli Lilly like today?

Cepicky: Unfortunately, Michael, I don’t hold the title of governor. I’m just a representative up there, but we are encouraging our governor and our leadership to reach out right now.

And, most importantly, this is something that Dr. Piercy should be taking the lead on right now. Her job is to protect Tennessee in health crisises.

One could argue we’re in a health crisis here with these monoclonal antibodies. She should be doing everything she can to secure the necessary medicine for our citizens.

Leahy: But she doesn’t seem to be doing anything except saying, “If you’re vaccinated, you don’t get the monoclonal antibodies now.” That’s what she said. Apparently, according to this Epoch Times article.

Cepicky: We call that medicine rationing, and we don’t do that in Tennessee because we have the means to not do that.

Leahy: Apparently, Lisa Piercy, the commissioner of health thinks we do.

Cepicky: Sometimes we have to disagree with the commissioner, and, you know, I’ve done that on a couple of occasions where we’ve called them out on their policies and procedures.

Maybe they need to take another look at this and before the General Assembly has to chime in and just make this right and fix it as quickly as possible.

Leahy: What are the odds of that happening?

Cepicky: (Chuckles) I wish we were in session right now because we have a little bit more authority to wield. But I know that government operations will probably be addressing this next month.

I know Chairman Reagan on Gov. Ops and Chairman Roberts are very concerned about this. And I would not be surprised if this is not rectified very quickly, that by the time we get to the government Operations Committee next month I’m sure this will be front and center.

Leahy: Crom Carmichael has a question for you, Scott.

Carmichael: A quick question on special sessions. Do special sessions have to be called for a particular reason? Or if you call a special session and then something like this comes up, can it be addressed in that special session?

Cepicky: So it depends on who calls it. If the governor calls the special session, he has the ability and the authority to limit the call to precisely what the governor wants to address.

If the General Assembly calls the special session, it is open to any bill that we want to consider. It’s basically like we’re coming back into a normal session and we’re going back to work.

Leahy: So have you asked Governor Lee to call for a special session? And what did he say to you?

Cepicky: Well, I haven’t talked to him directly on that. Speaker Sexton sent that letter with the 72 Republican representatives from the House calling for a special session by the governor.

I would much prefer to have the latitude to address the COVID issues and the liability issues with our businesses and the mask mandates.

School issues and this monoclonal antibody issue. I would much prefer that the General Assembly calls itself back into session so that we can take up a multitude of issues and address them all at one time.

Leahy: According to the Tennessee Constitution there are two ways for a special session, the governor can call it. Or if two thirds of the members of the House and two-thirds of the members of the state Senate say we want a special session, then they can call such a special session.

The lieutenant governor, the speaker, the Senate, and the speaker of the house send a letter to the governor saying, two-thirds on both houses. We’re calling a special session.

I know Speaker Cameron Sexton wants to do it, and every member of the Republican talks wants to do it. But in the Senate, it’s a different story.

Lieutenant Governor Randy McNally, who’s also the Speaker of the Senate, doesn’t want one. Any luck with the state senators calling special session now?

Cepicky: I think every day when you add this monoclonal antibody issue on top of it, of all the other issues that we’re facing in Tennessee right now, I think the pressure continues to mount on our Senate colleagues to get us back into session.

And, Michael, the thing that’s really perplexing is you saw that letter from Speaker Sexton, who represents the entire House of Representatives.

He’s the Speaker of the House. It’s very perplexing to me that not one Democrat signed on to at least coming into session and having these discussions on our schools and on mask mandates, etcetera, etcetera.

That’s the most perplexing thing is we can’t even get the other side of the aisle to step up to the plate and say, hey, let’s at least come in and have these discussions.

They don’t have to vote for the legislation I if they don’t want to, but at least come in and have the discussion that the people of Tennessee want.

And in the Senate, I hope we can continue to apply as polite of pressure as we can to begin with. But there comes a point in time when you got to do what’s right.

And I think it’s time for us to get back into session through the General Assembly so that we can talk about the issues that we need to talk about and then get legislation going to continue to move Tennessee forward.

Listen to the third hour here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crom Carmichael Discusses the Bureaucratic Attempt at Managing the Distribution of Monoclonal Antibodies Source

Crom Carmichael Discusses the Bureaucratic Attempt at Managing the Distribution of Monoclonal Antibodies Source

 

Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael in studio to weigh in on the Biden administration’s desperate attempt to gain control at the source of the monoclonal antibody COVID-19 and its distribution.

Leahy: In the studio, the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael. Crom, during the break, you were telling me about this crazy press conference in which White House staffers, in essence, shut down and insulted the prime minister of the United Kingdom.

Carmichael: No, it wasn’t that. The aids, what they did was they shouted down when the press started asking questions of Biden about the southern border, the White House aides in the room started making so much noise that you couldn’t hear the answer.

And essentially shut down the questioning. I want to get back to what you were talking about. And I want to try to tie this into a whole lot of other things because to me, they are all related. You and I can agree that the exit from Afghanistan was a fiasco?

Leahy: Debacle.

Carmichael: We can agree that the control of the southern border is just terrible.

Leahy: A violation of American immigration law by the Biden maladministration. There’s a story here that the U.S. pledged to send vaccines to others around the world. It apparently is also just a complete disaster for logistical reasons.

So all of the major things like policy initiatives or things that the administration is supposed to be doing, they’ve all been executed terribly. Just terribly. We could say this is just an example of just gross incompetence.

Leahy: That’s one thing we could say.

Carmichael: We could. What would be the worst thing you could say?

Leahy: It’s intentional.

Carmichael: Yeah, that it’s intentional.

Leahy: That’s the most likely.

Carmichael: And I believe that all of this is intentional.

Leahy: I agree, too.

Carmichael: Let’s go back to when COVID broke and hydroxychloroquine was suggested that it could help people if they took it either as a prophylactic or if they took it immediately upon a diagnosis.

And Fauci and the entire federal government on the health care side shouted that down and called people names and really just shut down the distribution of a generic product. Just shut it down.

Leahy: Shut it down.

Carmichael: Now then later we find out that hydroxychloroquine actually did help.

Leahy: In certain circumstances.

Carmichael: And there’s no evidence that it ever hurt. On balance, it was helpful.

Leahy: But depending upon your circumstances.

Carmichael: And not how your doctors provided it. I’m saying on balance.

Leahy: On balance. I’m agreeing with you. It was helpful.

Carmichael: What I’m saying is that now you have this monoclonal. I can’t pronounce it.

Leahy: Monoclonal antibody.

Carmichael: Now it looks as if it works. The evidence is 70 percent of the time. It helps. So what is the Biden administration doing? They are trying to gain control of the source.

Leahy: Magic statement there Crom. That’s what’s happening.

Carmichael: And they are not just trying. They’re gaining control of the distribution. That’s why I was so important in the earlier one when I said this is how pharmaceuticals are distributed. This is the logistics. So you have the Biden administration.

Leahy: That is another way. It’s a way when the marketplace such as this is working and you have a pharmaceutical like this, the distributor who’s been vetted and approved.

Carmichael: And knows how to handle the drug.

Leahy: How to handle the drug and how to move it through the supply chain to get that it can be delivered over to patients.

Carmichael: Quickly. Yes.

Leahy: The people who know what they’re doing.

Carmichael: Yes. And Biden is saying we’re going to abandon the system that works, and we’re going to replace it with a bureaucratic system that manages distribution.

Leahy: Which never works.

Carmichael: Which won’t work because the people who are now in charge have never done it right. Let’s look at an article in The Wall Street Journal. Headline.

U.S. Pledged to Vaccinate Poor Countries Stumbles Amid Logistical Challenges. And this article goes on to point out that there are so many different things about the handling of pharmaceuticals to address COVID that require special handling that the Biden administration people are clueless.

Leahy: Well, they’re political hacks. And they don’t know anything about the supply chain or managing medical supplies. They’re hacks.

Carmichael: Right. But yet they are the ones who are in charge. They now want to be in charge, and they’re about to be in charge of the distribution of a very important pharmaceutical throughout the U.S. market.

So here’s my question Michael. And I’ve raised this over and over again. Let’s even look at it from the standpoint of Tennessee.

If somebody who would have lived dies because of a bureaucratic decision to specifically withhold the drugs from that person is the bureaucrat that did it as liable as a police officer who shoots somebody while they are on duty?

Leahy: Let me answer that question. I think it’s a great question. I think the answer is that the way things work right now, there’s no liability. Would you agree with that?

Carmichael: I asked the question because I literally don’t know. What I’m saying is is if the Biden administration takes control of the distribution of pharmaceuticals, and then it is found that they are specifically denying pharmaceuticals to red states, let’s say or they’re giving as much as New York wants and as much as California wants but denying the drug to Florida and Tennessee and Alabama and Texas. Let’s just say that it’s doing that.

Leahy: And it looks like it.

Carmichael: But you find absolute documentation. You can prove it.

Leahy: And you can prove it.

Carmichael: My question is, can any of those people be held criminally liable?

Leahy: Let’s just say a 66-year-old male who’s got the vaccine tests positive for COVID-19 goes in and asks his doctor to get the monoclonal antibody treatment is denied because of the Biden administration policy.

And then if that person then becomes sick and dies, what does his family do? What recourse do they have?

Carmichael: Right. That’s the question.

Listen to the full second hour here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crom Carmichael Weighs in on Tennessee Department of Health’s Decision to Not Offer Monoclonal Antibodies to Fully Vaccinated People

Crom Carmichael Weighs in on Tennessee Department of Health’s Decision to Not Offer Monoclonal Antibodies to Fully Vaccinated People

 

Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael to the studio to discuss the Tennessee Department of Health’s announcement that fully vaccinated COVID-19 persons will not receive the monoclonal antibody treatment.

Leahy: We are joined in studio by the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael. Crom, good morning.

Carmichael: Good morning, Michael.

Leahy: I’m going to need your help, Crom, unraveling this mystery. And it makes no sense to me as most of the things going on with the Biden administration.

But this is in particular what’s going on with the Tennessee Department of Health as well. So, are you ready to put on your mystery-solving hat?

Carmichael: I’m listening.

Leahy: You’re listening?

Carmichael: Yes.

Leahy: So you may recall that I’ve talked a little bit about my personal game plan for COVID-19.

Carmichael: Yes.

Leahy: I do not have COVID-19. I have never had COVID-19. I’ve gotten the Pfizer vaccine. Both shots.

Carmichael: Good for you.

Leahy: But everywhere you look, there are breakthrough cases of COVID-19, right? People have got their shots and they get COVID-19. I’ve told you what my plan is. My plan has been okay.

If I test positive, I will follow the best recommendation of doctors, which is to go immediately and get a monoclonal antibody treatment if my provider would do that.

Carmichael: You have said that yes.

Leahy: Many a time I’ve said that. I don’t know about many of the time.

Carmichael: But you’ve said it.

Leahy: I’ve said it on air.

Carmichael: That’s where I know it’s true.

Leahy: Privately, I said I told everybody that’s my plan, everybody. Because I know you’re waiting to know what my plan is. Why? Because you have to have your plan. So here’s the thing, Crom. Headline.

Our lead story this broke last night and everyone is scratching their head about it. We’re going to have State Representative Scott Cepicky on at 7:30 a.m.

He’s going to help unravel this and get his thoughts on it. Here’s the headline. Tennessee Department of Health says Vaccinated Not Recommended for Monoclonal Antibody Treatment. Now, why is that?

Carmichael: Why do you have to be recommended anyway?

Leahy: Well, that’s a very good question. That’s a very good question. The reason is these are guidelines. On September 3, the National Institute of Health put out guidelines. And in response to these guidelines, Lisa Piercy…

Carmichael: What are the National Institute of Health guidelines?

Leahy: Put out September 3.

Carmichael: Yes, what are they?

Leahy: While there are currently no shortages of these monoclonal antibodies, by the way, on September 3, a week later, Biden announces rationing of them.

And so far, as far as I can tell, Regeneron and Eli Lilly make these items and they’re purchased from them by the federal government. And then they distribute them.

Carmichael: Only? Is that the way it’s always been?

Leahy: I’m trying to figure this out. This is a new treatment just recently approved by the FDA.

Carmichael: It’s never been that way.

Leahy: Actually, in this particular instance, as far as I know, and we have a call into Regeneron. Right now during the break, I called them and I said, we want to know if a private hospital went to you and said, we want to buy some monoclonal antibodies would you sell it to them?

Carmichael: Or if a pharmaceutical distributor.

Leahy: Anybody.

Carmichael: It’s not anybody. The pharmaceutical industry operates in the similar way to the liquor industry.

Leahy: Through distributors.

Carmichael: Through distributors. And you have to have an account set up. You have to be vetted. I’m not trying to defend anything.

Leahy: No, no. This is why you are the original all-star panelist. Knowing these details is very important.

Carmichael: It is a controlled industry, just as alcohol is a controlled industry. And so consequently, you have to have a license.

You have to have a license, for example, to sell alcohol. You can’t just be a retailer and open a store. You have to go through a process and a doctor or a hospital or a pharmaceutical has to have a license in order to issue drugs that are covered by the FDA. In other words, they’re not over the counter.

I’m not trying to defend anybody. I want to explain this. As far as I know, pharmaceutical products are purchased by distributors. And in the case of Walgreens and CVS or the great big ones, they might have a company-owned distributorship.

Leahy: Or some of the larger hospital chains.

Carmichael: Exactly.

Leahy: Let me go with this guideline. It’s called the COVID-19 Treatment Guideline Panel. It’s from the National Institute of Health. We are on September 22nd. This was issued 19 days ago on September third.

While there are currently no shortages of these monoclonal antibodies, logistical constraints or Biden’s administration policies can make it difficult to administer these agents to all eligible patients in situations where it is necessary to triage eligible patients the panel suggests prioritizing the following groups over vaccinated individuals who are expected to have mounted an adequate immune response.

Number one, unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated individuals who are at high risk of progressing to severe COVID-19 are at a higher priority, the panels suggest. But it does also say vaccinated individuals are not expected to mount an adequate immune response eg immunocompromised individuals. It goes on to say that these are clinical decisions made by the healthcare provider.

But how does the Tennessee Department of Health Commissioner Lisa Piercy interpret these rules? This is their quote from The Epoch Times story via The Tennesseean.

“The emergency use authorization of these monoclonal antibodies is only for people with these conditions, and it has been the same since day one. The new thing is the NIH criteria. What we just read to you was released on September 3. Even if you have those conditions, but you’re vaccinated, you don’t get it now.”

That’s not how I read the NIH guidelines.

It doesn’t say you don’t get it if you’re vaccinated. The guideline says that you’re not on the top priority. It doesn’t mean you don’t and also, it says it is your provider who makes the decision.

That is your health care provider. But nonetheless, Bill Lee’s, Commissioner of Health, is saying, you can. She just said it in this quote. You cannot get monoclonal antibiotic treatment if you’re vaccinated.

Carmichael: Let me ask a back question.

Leahy: I’m listening.

Carmichael: What’s the name of this person?

Leahy: Lisa Piercy. Commissioner of health.

Carmichael: Wasn’t the previous commissioner of health fired?

Leahy: No, she was not the previous commissioner of health. She was like, two layers down. She was in charge of immunization. It was the same type of thing.

It had to do with vaccinations and what the government policy had to do with that lower-level bureaucrat’s interpretation of the mature minor policy as it relates to vaccinating kids without the approval of their parents. A different deal.

Carmichael: But COVID-related.

Leahy: It was COVID related.

Carmichael: What I’m saying is that the other person got fired for trying to micromanage an area of COVID and requiring people to essentially bend the knee to that opinion or whatever it was. And got pressure for that or they got fired.

Leahy: Not exactly. It’s Michelle Fiscus, I think, was her name. There were multiple reasons why she got fired, according to the department of health.

One of them had to do with a bad work environment. The other was she without proper vetting and set forward a state policy that the legal counsel had not approved.

Carmichael: Beurecratic overreach.  Would that be a sufficient description? I’m asking that because what you have told me also appears to be a bureaucratic overreach. We’ll continue this after the break.

Leahy: We’ll see what Representative Scott Cepicky says about that at 7:30. We have so much to talk about here and so little time and so little time. A crazy Biden press conference.

Listen to the second hour here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mayor Andy Ogles Discusses the Incremental Marginalization of State Governors by the Federal Government

Mayor Andy Ogles Discusses the Incremental Marginalization of State Governors by the Federal Government

 

Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed Maury County Mayor Andy Ogles in the studio to discuss Governor Bill Lee and 26 other Tennessee state Republican’s letter to Joe Biden regarding Afghan refugees and the administration’s bias against southern states.

Leahy: And that is Behar County Sheriff Javier Salazar commenting about the border crisis. Andy Ogles Mayor of Maury County, there’s a story sort of related to that at The Tennessee Star. Right now, Governor Bill Lee has joined 25 Republican governors and requesting a meeting with Joe Biden regarding the border crisis.

The letter reads, as chief executives of our states, we request a meeting with you at the White House to bring an end to the national security crisis created by eight months of unenforced borders. Do you think Joe Biden is going to take that meeting Andy?

Ogles: (Sighs) Who knows? But even if he does, what does anyone really expect to come out of it? That proclamation, that announcement is nothing more than a campaign soundbite. It doesn’t have any action attached to it.

What I would love to see is governors across the country refuse services to illegals or migrants settled in states without the state’s permission.

Don’t give them any state Medicaid or dollars or those sorts of things and put it back on the federal government.

Leahy: This is interesting because Governor Lee has signed this letter, along with 25 other Republican governors. Say, pretty, please, Mr. President. Meet with us so we can complain about what you’re doing, which will have zero zip nada effect.

And yet at the same time, he appears to be welcoming with open arms, a wave of unvetted for security or health purposes Afghan refugees. Already over 400 have arrived in Tennessee.

More than 300 apparently have been resettled in Tennessee. Governor Lee has said, well, gee, I’m not so sure I like this, but he’s doing nothing to change it. Your thoughts on that?

Ogles: Well, keep in mind, those numbers are just for Nashville. And we have documented cases in Memphis, Chattanooga, and Knoxville now where Afghan refugees have been resettled there, so one can only guestimate.

There’s not a lot of clarity here that that number could be closer to 1,000, if not more. But again, I appreciate their service for those that actually may have helped us.

Leahy: Well that’s a very, very limited number. The reports are 95,000 Afghan refugees are coming to the United States of America. A very small percentage of them were the interpreters that helped us.

Most of them are unvetted, possible terrorists, and certainly possibly unvaccinated. (Chuckles) And they’re going to be paid with all their social welfare. In the beginning, I think it will be covered by the federal government. But after eight months, it’s all on Tennessee taxpayers.

Ogles: Yes, that’s right. Look, again, I appreciate your service. But for those that helped us in Afghanistan, why didn’t we help resettle them to Kuwait or Jordan, the UAE, or somewhere else like that?

And at the end of the day, you have to be a fool if you don’t understand that Islam and Christianity, just don’t mix. Islam and a free Republic don’t mix.

And so we now have imported hundreds of thousands of people who at the end of the day, the religion hates America.

Leahy: That’s interesting because now we’re about maybe two percent of the American population is Muslim. My view is that there are those of that background who assimilate to America.

But there are quite a few whose general worldview is not consistent with the American concept of a constitutional Republic. They want to have a caliphate.

Ogles: And that goes back to the whole unvetted problem. And that is you have so many of these folks who are truly unvetted. We have no idea who they are.

All they came with is scraps of paper. And so who they claim they are, it may not be who they actually are. There’s no way to know. And we’ve just opened the door. Come on in.

Leahy: We have a law called the Refugee Act of 1980, which set standards for the legal admission of refugees in the United States. It’s a lengthy process, and they have to be reviewed and vetted.

I have yet to figure out why these 950 Afghan refugees are not going through that legal process. Apparently, the Biden administration is bigfooting American governors and bringing them all in. Here’s the story.

Andy, from Eric Lender at The Tennessee Star. We have only one story that says 26 Republican governors sent a letter to Biden. Please meet with us so we can talk about the southern border.

But 18 Republican governors apparently support Biden’s Afghan refugee settlement plan. Last week, the White House declared that at least 360 Afghans will be resettled in the US across 46 different states.

The only states that will not be receiving refugees or Hawaii, South Dakota, West Virginia, Wyoming, and Washington, D.C.

Ogles: Again, why is Tennessee not in an opt-out position? When I look at this and you mentioned the federal government kind of pushing the governors around, I think this is part of a larger problem and a larger agenda where you have the federal government overstepping its authority and forcing the states to become co-opted into a program and co-opted into a policy.

And so it’s incrementally marginalizing our governors in our states. And keep in mind, we are a free Republic. We have the 10th amendment.

And whether it’s COVID or refugees or whatever, these governors have to stand up and start fighting. And playing footsie with a President who does not like us is not getting us anywhere.

Leahy: Yeah, it’s and it seems to be pretty transparently not liking the southern states.

Ogles: It’s blatant.

Leahy: Here’s an example. This is a story from Fox 17. Distribution changes in monoclonal antibody treatments may cause shortages in Tennessee hospitals. Did you see this story?

It seems to be a blatant political punishment of his opponents by the Biden maladministration. Here’s the story from Fox 17. The demand for the monoclonal antibody treatment for COVID-19 patients has led the federal government to change the way it allocates its supply. This is a very kind of neutral reporting from Fox 17.

The Department of Health and Human Services announced they are distributing the antibiotic treatment doses based on state and territory, instead of allowing hospitals to directly order the number of treatments they need. And, yeah, a week and a half ago, if you wanted it, they distributed it to you. What’s wrong with this picture?

Ogles: They’ve kind of danced with this idea that they’re going to ration it to the states that don’t have the highest vaccine rates. It’s a dangerous position they’re putting themselves in. They being the federal government.

And so I think they’ve walked that back a little bit. But what you’re seeing, what they’ve done is you have a time of increased demand for the monoclonal antibodies.

The federal government is stockpiling a reserve, which is creating a choke point in the distribution. And so that they’re making states feel the pain through a kind of a stockpiling measure knowing, at the end of the day, you’ll start refusing treatment.

You’re going to have anarchy on your hands when you have someone who is sick. There’s a known treatment and they’re not able to get it.

I did see a different kind of on the idea of COVID that Israel is now beginning to recognize a natural immunity. It’ll be interesting to see if other states, businesses, et cetera reacts with a treatment that’s available.

You have the vaccines that are available. Where does natural immunity fit into this dialogue? And that’s, I guess, yet untold.

Leahy: Interestingly enough, last week, the entire Republican congressional delegation, all seven members, sent a letter to the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

And basically, they said, why are you changing the distribution policy, and why are you limiting it to Tennessee? They haven’t gotten an answer yet. I kind of like what Ron DeSantis said.

He said, okay, you want to ration the distribution of this stuff to us? We’re going to go out as a state and buy it from another vendor. I like that idea.

Ogles: Absolutely. And kudos to Ron DeSantis on this whole COVID vaccine virus issue, he has truly been a leader.

Listen to the full second hour here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Official Guest Host Grant Henry Weighs in on What the Democrats Are Trying to Push Through in Congress

Official Guest Host Grant Henry Weighs in on What the Democrats Are Trying to Push Through in Congress

 

Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed official guest host and Grassroots Engagement Director of Americans for Prosperity-Tennessee Grant Henry in studio to discuss the Democrat’s multi-trillion-dollar spending package and how they have connected moral values to products.

Leahy: Joined in studio by the official guest host of The Tennessee Star Report, Grant Henry. Ben Cunningham has passed the baton to Grant. I think the reason is that he doesn’t like getting up at 3:30 am in the morning.

Why would anybody not like doing that? (Henry chuckles) And you are prepared to get up at 3:30 a.m. in the morning.

Henry: That’s God’s time, man. (Leahy laughs) That’s when the real work gets done. I’m telling you.

Leahy: Grant, we were talking during the break, and there may be some fraying going on among the Democrats in Washington, D.C. Tell us about that.

Henry: Yes. Look, I think y’all the pressure is working. The pressure you’re putting on these Democrats, especially in DC, it’s working specifically as it pertains to this boondoggle of a $3.5 trillion spending package.

We already heard that Democrat Senator Joe Manchin last Sunday said he will not support the three $5 trillion package in its current form. Now, Kyrsten Sinema has also come out, and Politico is reporting that she apparently told Joe Biden, they had a private meeting on Wednesday that “If the House delays it scheduled September 27 vote on this spending ing bill or if it fails, she will also not be backing the reconciliation bill.”

Not just her, Michael. Representative Kurt Straighter over in the House, one of approximately ten moderate House Democrat members is playing hardball with leadership over there. He said that several members of their group are on the same page about this.

Some of the lawmakers have convened and say that the message is that it’s up to chain leadership to convince them that they need to keep these two bills together. And saying, if they delay the vote or if it goes down, then I think you can kiss reconciliation goodbye.

Leahy: I’m glad you said that because I thought you were about to say, kiss something else. (Laughter)

Henry: Maybe that’s what some people are feeling. But if this doesn’t make sense to some of y’all, the reason why this whole idea of keeping them together and keeping it up together. What they mean by that is Nancy Pelosi is taking a big gamble in the House.

She’s trying to satisfy the progressives in the House by saying look. If you pass both of these things together, the one $2 trillion in big air quotes here infrastructure package, at the same time as the three $3.5 trillion boondoggle bill, then the progressives will be satisfied.

The moderates in the House are saying, look, I’m not for this nonsensical three $5 trillion spending. The parliamentarian in Senate just said that you can’t include amnesty on the Senate side. So you’re pushing stuff in there that has nothing to do with spending.

Leahy: And from Breitbart News, I’ll read the story. The Senate parliamentarian ruling Sunday effectively kills any chance of illegal alien amnesty through 2024. Senate parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough’s rule that the Democrats plan to slip a massive amnesty for millions of illegal aliens into a bill does not comply with the Byrd rule.

That’s a former majority leader, Robert Byrd, regarding budgetary reconciliation. Democrats hope they could use their $3.5 trillion infrastructure bill to pass an amnesty.

MacDonough said Democrat lawmakers could not use reconciliation, which primarily relates to spending changes to the budget. To make sure such a drastic policy change as granting amnesty to illegal immigrants.

Henry: Here’s the calculation as far as Politico sees it. They think it’s a progressive think that if they band together and threatened to kill this infrastructure bill, the $1.2 trillion, it will convince moderate members to go along with the larger reconciliation package.

But multiple sources, including a senior Democrat aid and several in the decenters camp are telling Politico that the left is misreading their colleagues. If Nancy Pelosi gambles here it is to keep these two ridiculous things together, $4.7 trillion worth of spending to keep them together to satisfy the progressives, the moderates are saying we’ll kill all of it.

We’re not going to risk our reputation of $4.7 trillion worth of nonsense spending that will hit the people least able to afford it. So here’s how I think we win as Republicans. visit. stopthespendingspree.com. Sign that letter.

I think if we continually push this message that $4.7 trillion is wasted spending with historic tax increases that would lower worker wages and crush small businesses. Massive energy taxes and California-style mandates will add hundreds of dollars to your energy bills and it’ll put the government in more control over your health care.

Michael, this bill has nearly half a trillion dollars in healthcare spending. That’s one and a half times more than it was in the entirety of Obamacare.

These types of messages will force Nancy Pelosi to make a distinction between the two bills, possibly separate them, or have moderates kill the entirety of all of them. It’s encouraging for me. I think we keep the pressure on.

Leahy: Grant, we need encouragement. And I’m glad you’re encouraged because if you’re encouraged, I’m encouraged. And our listening audience, which really needs encouragement, is encouraged as well.

Senator Bill Hagerty from Tennessee was also encouraged. He tweeted this out yesterday. He said the nonpartisan Senate parliamentarian has ruled that Democrats’ mass amnesty plan cannot be included in a budget bill.

Their tax and spend spree remains dangerous for our economy. But on immigration, Democrats will now focus hopefully on the massive border crisis they’ve created and ignored. I think hopefully was the active word there Grant.

Henry: Yes. The immigration situation is something that needs a full-on look. Republicans continue to believe that immigration is still good, but our system is broken especially in times of unprecedented economic challenge.

Republicans, we stand behind the idea that we welcome immigrants who are motivated to improve their lives and contribute to society that will enrich American lives.

Many immigrants or entrepreneurs who start businesses create jobs, generate demand for other goods and services, which in turn requires businesses to hire more people. It works out better for all of us!

However, Democrats in this administration need to acknowledge that Americans are feeling unsafe about their health and are feeling anxious about their economic future, and may feel threatened because of that.

They also need to acknowledge that there is an unprecedented crisis going on at the border and we simply cannot afford to kick this issue along extreme party lines anymore.

We’re dealing with real situations here that have real effects on real lives. This is no longer theoretical, Michael. We need to build a better immigration system for the long term.

We also need to focus on fixing the broken system immediately. I feel like what Democrats are doing is trying to cram something in an alleged spending bill that does not do service to what we really need to focus on here in this country.

Leahy: Democrats also want to do this, I’d be delighted to hear your reaction to this. They plan a $12,500 tax credit for pricey electric car purchases. This is at The Tennessee Star. Tennesseestar.com. House Republicans are arguing against a Democratic proposal to increase the $7,500 taxpayer-funded credit for electric car purchases to as much as $12,500, arguing that it would disproportionately help wealthy Americans who can afford to buy pricey electric vehicles.

Democrats on the House Ways and Means Committee have proposed increasing the credit as part of their party’s filibuster-proof $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation bill which includes new social programs and billions for electric vehicle infrastructure. Your thoughts Grant.

Henry: Go some research on the amount of energy it takes to create one of those cars versus the amount of energy that you’re saving out of it. What kind of metals do you need to get those batteries? What is going on?

Leahy: I think it’s Lithium.

Henry: What’s the human cost involved?

Leahy: That’s pretty darn high from what I can tell. It’s interesting because when you look at what the Democrats on the left have done is they have attached moral values to products.

So an electric car is a moral good. A car powered by gasoline is a moral, bad.  That’s the simplicity of it. But the reality of it is if you look at the power and the impact on the environment, to me, I think that the evidence is that electric vehicles have a more destructive impact on the environment.

If you go all the way back to the key factor, which is lithium batteries, the mining of lithium is extraordinarily destructive from what I’ve read.

Henry: No, exactly. There’s a human toll involved as well. There’s child labor, possibly in some of the situations going on to mine some of this stuff out.

Leahy: It comes from third-world countries.

Henry: And I think you hit it on the head when you add a moral component to pushing some of this in the guise of, I don’t know, doing something to say, save the world or carbon tax credits or a Green New Deal or anything that you’re really trying to push through an ulterior motive, you get a problem because you’re pushing something you don’t fully understand.

You’re pushing something to win in PR points but not understanding what the policy might actually be doing to our country.

If we really want to have a conversation about energy, I don’t know why nuclear is not brought up every single time. But no one ever brings that up anymore. I don’t know. Maybe for reasons I don’t fully understand.

Leahy: Nuclear is interesting because it was for a period of time, morally bad. Jane Fonda and Michael Douglas in the China Syndrome movie, morally bad. But now they don’t know what to do because it doesn’t have bad emissions on it.

But, you know, way back when, 40 years ago, the left and Jane Fonda and Michael Douglas and Jack Lemon all said it was bad. Personally, I think the idea of Adam Smith’s idea of the marketplace working, that is a way to go.

We’re moving more towards the government working and telling everybody what’s a good product, what’s a bad product. I say it’s none of their business.

Listen to the third hour here:

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Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author of Journeys with a Tin Can Pilgrim, Lynda Rozell on Inspiration to Give Everything up and Travel via Airstream

Author of Journeys with a Tin Can Pilgrim, Lynda Rozell on Inspiration to Give Everything up and Travel via Airstream

 

Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed Lynda Rozell, aka the Tin Can Pilgrim, to the newsmaker line to discuss what motivated her to sell everything and hit the road in an Airstream trailer. 

Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker line by Lynda Rozell, the author of Journeys with a Tin Can Pilgrim. Welcome, Lynda. And of course, the first question is, what is a Tin Can Pilgrim?

Rozell: Good morning. I’m so happy to be here. And a tin can pilgrim is what I call myself because I live in a big tin can on wheels, also known as an Airstream travel trailer.

Leahy: Airstream, of course, they are the elite trailers. When I was a kid, my dad aspired to own an Airstream trailer. That was in the 60s. And the deal was that we started off with these tents that you’d haul around behind the car and you’d go to a campground and put up the tent.

My mother hated the tent. (Chuckles) So then we progressed to a regular trailer. But my dad always wanted to get an Airstream but could never afford it. Tell us about why you live in an Airstream trailer.

Rozell: That’s the second part of the name. The pilgrim part. I think I’ve led a pretty conventional life before I started doing this. But about three years ago, I was on the verge of becoming an empty nester.

And I also was at kind of a transition point in my career. And I really just sort of prayed to God and said, well, what should be the next thing I do in life? I had my own ideas about that but somehow he put it on my heart to buy an Airstream travel trailer and a truck. I had to learn how to drive the truck because previously I lived in an urban area and only drove a Mazda three.

So that was quite a transition itself to go up to a Ram 1500 truck. And within four months of really coming to the decision to do this, I had quit my job, sold my house, taken my equity, and purchase the Airstream travel trailer and the truck, which sounds kind of crazy.

Leahy: Well, it doesn’t sound go totally crazy. But it sounds a little bit unusual. I sort of remember some stories about people again, back in the 60s, I’m dating myself, people that just roamed around the country.

And this is sort of a literary theme as well. You see television programs and literary themes. I recall the famous 1960s program with Ben Gazara. Remember that one? Run for your life. Do you remember that one?

Rozell: Well, actually, at that time in the 1960s, I was too young to watch TV. (Laughter) Well, the idea was the guy was a guy diagnosed with some terminal disease but it would be a disease where he would be normal and then just drop dead.

That was the claim. So what he did was, I’m going to live life and he sold everything and he ran around the country having adventures with beautiful women and crazy people. You know? One of those deals.

It ran for three years. It was very popular. At the end of the show, it was determined that it was a misdiagnosis anyway and he went on to live for a long time. That was the premise of the show.

Rozell: That’s funny. I wonder if he fell in love with the lifestyle because so many people do. I’m a full-time nomad. I don’t have a stick and brick house, as we call the stable location in one place.

A traditional house. But this is a huge movement. There are a lot of people that are doing this, and it’s delightful because I can go anywhere. I want. My home is on wheels.

And especially out west, there’s a lot of land that’s public land that’s very inexpensive to camp on. And I’ve also made networks of friends where I can roam around and visit people I’ve met and stay in their yards or their driveways temporarily.

And at the same time, I can go visit my grown children whenever I want and bring my own home with me. It provides a little bit of that comfortable distance, which makes it easy to visit often.

Leahy: So tell me about your life before. I’m not going to say you didn’t go crazy.

Rozell: Right.

Leahy: But tell me about your life before you made this dramatic change in it. How about that?

Rozell: Sure. I think this is something I really found myself able to do because of developing faith in God and radical trust in God. And that happened through a lot of suffering in my life.

I had been very successful professionally in my youth. I had a prominent position in the federal government as an attorney, working for the federal trade.

Leahy: You were an attorney?

Rozell: Yes.

Leahy: You went to law school?

Rozell: I went to UVA. (Chuckles)

Leahy: You went to the University of Virginia Law School?

Rozell: Yes I did.

Leahy: That’s the top ten law school. Or maybe top five, depending, I guess UVA grads would say top five.

Rozell: Lots of UVA grads would say. (Chuckles)

Leahy: Charlottesville, Virginia.

Rozell: I loved Charlottesville, Virginia. I moved to Charlottesville when I was 20 years old and just stayed there. I finished my undergrad. I got a bachelor’s in foreign affairs, a master’s in foreign affairs and then I switched to law school and got my JD.

And very promptly went to work for a prominent Virginia law firm then called Hunton and Williams which has since become swallowed up at one of these mergers. And I worked for them for a few years.

And then I ended up through certain circumstances with the loss of a close friend. I started to go to Church again, and I started to reevaluate the track that my life was on because what I did was work all the time.

Leahy: You worked all the time. Now many of our listening audience can relate to this. I perhaps could relate to this. (Chuckles)

Rozell: Yes. Well in the tail end of the 1980s when I graduated and being a graduate from a top law school meant that you were wooed by law firms and paid very handsomely. But the cost of that is you were expected to work very, very hard, and the law firm had to be number one.

And my husband didn’t really have a problem with that, because he was really enjoying all the things that this position enabled us to enjoy together as a couple in terms of lifestyle.

And it was really a merry-go-round. The first nine months I worked I ended up having one afternoon off. I literally worked every single day. (Chuckles)

Leahy: That’s not very healthy, is it?

Rozell: It is not healthy, but it was very exciting. But you burn out when you work like that.

Leahy: Yes. You burn out. And so you were married. How many kids did you have? I have two children. They’re both grown, both daughters.

And they think that what mom is doing now is the coolest thing ever in part because they can see that I am the happiest I’ve ever been in my life.

Leahy: So when did you have the epiphany to sell it all? What sparked it? You say you got your Airstream and you’re ready to sell it all. What sparked the whole thing?

Rozell: What really what sparked the whole thing was seeing Airstreams for the first time because they’re pretty cool, aren’t they?

Leahy: Because they are pretty cool aren’t they?

Rozell: They are really cool. And when you were saying your dad wanted to buy one in the next, probably some of those Airstreams that you saw, they are still on the road now.

Leahy: Very well built.

Rozell: That’s the thing with Airstreams. They are very expensive, but they’re really not like other RVs, because they’re built like airplanes, and they have an out-of-home and an inner home of aluminum.

They still involve a great deal of hand labor in the assembly process and in the manufacturing process. And I have friends who have vintage Airstreams from the 1959s and 60s, where they’ve had to replace certain things and have upgraded certain things. But the basic trailer is the same as it was.

Leahy: Now, if I wanted to send you a letter by mail, where would I send it?

Rozell: Oh, that’s a great question. You would send it to Florida because I have something called a mail forwarding agent in Florida, and I’m actually a Florida resident. And a lot of full-time voters and full-time RVers do this.

Leahy: Of course, because there’s no state income tax there.

Rozell: Well, Florida’s, big Texas is big. South Dakota is big. Tennessee is actually growing in popularity too as a location.

Leahy: Where are you right now by the way?

Rozell: Right now, I am on the north shore of Long Island, looking out of a window in a 1790s farmhouse that friends of mine who are also Airstreamers now.

I came to visit them for a couple of days. My Airstream is parked in their driveway and this is one of the benefits of Airstreaming.

Leahy: If somebody wanted to buy your book, where would they go? We’ve got 30 seconds. Give us a plug for your book on your website.

Rozell: Okay. It’s tincanpilgrimbook.com. Or you can go to Amazon and search for Journeys with a Tin Can Pilgrim.

Leahy: Tincanpilgrimbook.com. Lynda Rozell, good luck on your travels. When you get to Nashville, come on in studio.

Rozell: Absolutely, I would love to do that.

Listen to the full first hour here:

– – –

Tune in weekdays from 5:00 – 8:00 a.m. to the Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy on Talk Radio 98.3 FM WLAC 1510. Listen online at iHeart Radio.